Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Featured eBooks: Indigenous Australian studies

Arrernte present, Arrernte past: Invasion, violence, and imagination in Indigenous central Australia. The Arrernte people of Central Australia first encountered Europeans in the 1860s as groups of explorers, pastoralists, missionaries, and laborers invaded their land. During that time the Arrernte were the subject of intense curiosity, and the earliest accounts of their lives, beliefs, and traditions were a seminal influence on European notions of the primitive. The first study to address the Arrernte’s contemporary situation, this book also documents the immense sociocultural changes they have experienced over the past hundred years.


Belonging together: Dealing with the politics of disenchantment in Australian Indigenous policy. provides a unique overview of the trajectory of current Indigenous policy, with Sullivan advancing a new consolidated approach to Indigenous policy which moves beyond the debate over self-determination and assimilation. Instead, he suggests that the interests of Indigenous peoples, settlers and immigrants are fundamentally shared, and proposes adaptation on both sides, but particularly for the descendants of settlers and immigrants, to allow them to embrace the framing of their identity by an Indigenous presence.


Indifferent Inclusion: Aboriginal people and the Australian nation. This book offers a holistic interpretation of the complex relationship between Indigenous and settler Australians during the middle four decades of the twentieth century. Combining the perspectives of political, social and cultural history in a coherent narrative, he provides a cogent analysis of how the relationship changed, and the impediments to change.

Kurlumarniny: We come from the desert. We come from the desert is the story of Minyjun (Monty Hale), a senior Ngulipartu man from the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Written in his own language and in English, Minyjun shares with us his extraordinary life, from his family’s migration from the desert to the station country of the eastern Pilbara, his childhood growing up on Mt Edgar Station, witnessing Australia’s engagement in World War II, and the famous Pilbara station-worker’s strike of 1946.

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