Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Exercise Your Mind and Climb a Mountain of Literature

Feeling energetic this summer? Why not put your mind to work and climb a mountain of literature? There are many books that require stamina of some sort from the reader. Below are some towering novels from the previous four centuries.


17th Century – Don Quixote
This immensely influential (and funny) book follows a man who reads too many stories of chivalry and knights and becomes delusional. He renames himself Don Quixote, and sets out for adventures. Cervantes provided Don Quixote with his servant turned squire, Sancho, and his “steed” Rocinante. The fight against the windmills is one of the more well known adventures of the book.

18th Century – The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman
In Laurence Sterne’s book we hear very little of the life of Tristram himself. The narrator is so often distracted (with very humorous consequence) that he does not even reach the moment of his birth until one third of the way through

19th Century – The Brothers Karamozov 
Dostoyevsky’s final novel is a book of depth that goes beyond the very engaging plot and asks that the reader consider the nature of concepts like faith and free will. In the novel’s most famous chapter, Ivan narrates a poem that puts God on trial at the time of the Spanish Inquisition.

20th Century - Ulysses
James Joyce wrote one of the most celebrated books that most people don’t actually finish. Elements of the novel parallel Homer’s Odyssey and individual chapters employ varied literary styles, from stream of consciousness, to the script of a play (with stage directions). Once banned for obscenity, Ulysses was known as a “dangerous” book. The novel follows a day in the life of Leopold Bloom (June 16, 1904 - now known as Bloomsday) as he wanders through Dublin.

Thursday, December 22, 2016

24 Hour Christmas Closedown of Readings & Past Exams

Readings & Past Exams will not be available from approximately 7pm 24th December for just over 24 hours as part of our anniversary rollover.

Library Opening Hours: Christmas 2016 and New Year period 2017

https://www.tes.com/lessons/PtPDR86w3lBwAA/christmas-in-australia
Library and Information Services would like to wish everybody a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Please note that Friday the 23rd is the last day the campus libraries (inc. the Mabo Library InfoCommons) will be open in 2016, and we will not reopen until 8am on the Tuesday the 3rd of January 2017.

In January 2017 opening hours for the
Eddie Koiki Mabo Library in Townsville and the Cairns campus library will be:
  • Monday to Friday - 8.00am to 5.00pm
  • Saturday and Sunday - Closed

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Summer Movie: Die Hard

JCU Library has a great collection of films! You can find them in 791.4372.

There has been quite a bit of internet debate about whether or not Die Hard can be considered a Christmas movie, the arguments are a bit flimsy but no one can deny that the movie is considered to be one of the greatest action movies of all time. Nominated for 4 Academy Awards, Die Hard was ranked number 29 in Empire Magazine's 500 Greatest Movies of All Time.

What it's about:

New York City policeman John McClane (Bruce Willis) is visiting his estranged wife and two daughters on Christmas Eve. He joins her at a holiday party in the headquarters of the Japanese-owned business she works for. But the festivities are interrupted by a group of terrorists who take over the exclusive high-rise, and everyone in it. Very soon McClane realizes that there's no one to save the hostages -- but him.

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Summer Reading: The Tales of Beedle the Bard by J. K. Rowling

The JCU library has many interesting fiction books to read over the summer, come check out a few of them.

Yes it's a Harry Potter book or, more precisely, a book from the world of Harry Potter. If you've read the Harry Potter books and seen the recent movie Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, but are still craving more Harry Potter, then this is the book for you. Look for The Tales of Beedle the Bard: Translated from the original runes by Hermione Granger in the curriculum section at 820ROWL.

What it's about:

The Tales of Beedle the Bard is the first new book from J. K. Rowling since the publication of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. The tales played a crucial role in assisting Harry, with his friends Ron and Hermione, to finally defeat Lord Voldemort. Fans will be thrilled to have this opportunity to read the tales in full. An exciting addition to the canon of Harry Potter, the tales reveal the wonderful versatility of the author, as she tackles with relish the structure and varying tones of a classic fairy tale.

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Take Your Summer Reading Out of This World with the Mars Trilogy!

The three award winning novels (Red Mars, Green Mars and Blue Mars) that make up the Mars trilogy begin in the near future and tell the story of the colonisation of Mars. The novels take us from the first hundred people that are sent to establish a human presence on the planet, through to their efforts to terraform Mars and later exist as an independent settlement.

The trilogy is immense in scope, very well researched, and based on the potentially possible. It covers the political, social and environmental aspects of forming a new colony on another planet.

Most importantly, this piece of speculative fiction is a page turner. There are memorable characters and plot lines that keep you hooked all the way from Red to Green to Blue.

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

New Book Recommendation: Managing and Interpreting D-Day Sites of Memory

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

 A book title of interest is: Managing and Interpreting D-Day Sites of Memory: Guardians of Remembrance edited by Geoffrey Bird, Sean Claxton and Keir Reeves.
Call Number: 940.5421421 MAN

An extract from the publisher's website states:
More than seventy years following the D-Day Landings of 6 June 1944, Normandy's war heritage continues to intrigue visitors and researchers. Receiving well over two million visitors a year, the Normandy landscape of war is among the most visited cultural sites in France. This book explores the significant role that heritage and tourism play in the present day with regard to educating the public as well as commemorating those who fought.

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

December 15 is National Cat Herder's Day!

http://www.lovethispic.com/image/69149/cute-kittens
Certain librarians are not quite sure who celebrates National Cat Herder's Day since even Wikipedia doesn't seem to know, but certain librarians who shall remain nameless could not go past an opportunity to post cat pictures.

According to daysoftheyear.com "This is a day for everyone who has to face the frustration of trying to manage the unmanageable, anyone whose day to day life involves insurmountable tasks...From project managers to daycare workers, head out and let those who handle impossible tasks with aplomb every day know how much you appreciate and, frankly, stand in awe of them. Someone has to be there to get these tasks done, and without those who seem to be capable of herding felines of the metaphoric variety, the world may not work as well as it does."

Just one more cat picture...

https://getreadingnow.wordpress.com/2011/12/12/cats-reading-books-2/

Monday, December 12, 2016

Food on campus over summer

Every now and then someone asks us about where they can get food while they are on campus. At this time of year, it's a tricky question to answer.  Each food provider has their own reasons for opening and closing when they do, and some will remain open for a little longer than others...

As things stand at the moment, this is where (and when) you can get something to eat:

Townsville:

Juliette's is open from 8.00am-2.00pm Mon-Thurs, and they close at 1.00pm on Fridays. They currently expect to close on Friday the 23rd of December, but this may change.

Miss Sushi is open from 8.00am-2.00pm, and will close on Thursday the 15th of December (opening again on January 9, 2017).

The Market Place (the food place formally known as "the Refec") is open from 7.30am-2.00pm (but they may still be around at 2.30pm), and will close on Friday the 16th of December.

The Green Plate is currently closed.

Jamaica Blue opens from 7.00am-2.30pm/3.00pm, depending on trade.  They'll close at 2.00pm on Friday the 23rd of December, and re-open on the 3rd of January.

Woolworths should still be open for normal Woolworths' hours during this time.

Cairns:

D’Lish (inside the Cairns Institute) is open 7:30am-3:30pm Monday to Friday, and expects to close on Friday the 16th of December.

Aroma Café (in the refectory) is open 8:00am-3:00pm Monday through Friday, and is also likely to close on the 16th of December.

That gives us a week in December and at least one week in January where food options will be pretty scarce indeed. In Townsville the Medilink Center in the Hospital will still have some options, and in Cairns you'll have to cross the roundabout to the shops on McGregor Road.

If you're on campus, you may want to bring a packed lunch.

Saturday, December 10, 2016

Stand Up For Someone's Rights Today!

For this year’s Human Rights Day (December 10th) the United Nations is urging all of us to be actively involved in safeguarding the rights of others. This year’s theme, “Stand up for someone's rights today!”, encourages us all to act and defend the rights of people at risk of discrimination or violence. Many small acts can make a big change in the world.

Head to the JCU Library (in person or online) to learn more about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights or to read about human rights issues in Australia.

Friday, December 9, 2016

Accessing the EKM Library (Or: The great "Find the Door" challenge of 2016)

The development of the veranda walk around the Eddie Koiki Mabo Library on the Townsville campus is continuing, and it is continuing to make accessing the building a fun and exciting adventure.

From Tuesday the 13th, the adventure will make some of our doors inaccessible, and others will only be able to be reached via certain routes, so if you need to access the building, this is what you need to know:

  • The Southern Entrance will be shut (that's the side closest to the free car park behind the library).
  • Access to the Cafe Entrance (the door closest to Juliette's) will be via a path leading from the library car park between the building and the bike shed.
  • You will not be able to get to the Cafe Entrance from the bridge from Education Central (AKA Building 134, AKA "the building with Miss Sushi in it"), but you will be able to get to the Northern Entrance if you keep walking.
  • The Northern Entrance will be accessible, but you will need to walk around the fencing to get to it.
  • You will need to use the path to the Northern Entrance to access the After Hours Info Commons door when the library is closed, as access to the eastern side of the building will be cut off.
Please note:
  • The student kitchenette outside the 24 Hour Info Commons will be closed during this time, so you will need to bring food that does not require a microwave or hot water.
  • You will not be able to easily access the Info Commons from the library car park after 5.00pm on weeknights or on the weekends. The best place to park during this time will be the ATSIP building (Bld 145) car park and the car park in front of Molecular Sciences (Bld 21).
We will let you know when the next stage of the adventure will take place.


Tropical Monsters: A call for submission

 Are you interested in the tropical folklore and beliefs that touch on all things monstrous? Well the Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics is releasing a special issue on this topic next year and is calling for submissions.

A Special Issue Volume 16, Issue 1, 2017 Submission deadline: 1 February 2017 TROPICAL LIMINAL: URBAN VAMPIRES (and other blood sucking monstrosities)

The vampire and other monstrous beings constitute some of the most famous myths that continue to haunt contemporary society. This special issue examines the presence of these beings within cities of the tropics and sub-tropics – from New Orleans in the deep south of America to Singapore in South East Asia – and examples from cities of the Caribbean, Latin America, African, the Pacific and tropical Asia. The special issue examines three aspects of liminality:
  • the liminal qualities of monstrous blood sucking beings such as: vampires, zombies, Pontianaks, sea sirens, were-tigers, shape-shifters and cyborgs.
  • the liminal and heterotopic spaces from which they arise, such as: cemeteries, bulldozed spaces, shrines, ritual spaces, schools and factories, between buildings, and everyday spaces of taboo.
  •  and how they manifest through liminal experiences of mass hysteria, trauma, anxiety, menstruation, dreams, and altered states of consciousness.
Also of interest is the way myths and stories arise through various media: material culture, film, literature, social media, visual arts, news reports, and scholarly works. Instructions for authors · Submissions close 1 February 2017 · Visit eTropic https://journals.jcu.edu.au/etropic

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Summer Movie: Contempt

JCU Library has a great collection of films! You can find them in 791.4372.

For lovers of cinema, Jean-Luc Godard’s 1963 film has Brigitte Bardot, Jack Palance, Fritz Lang and Michel Piccoli all on screen in gorgeous Italian scenery. A French writer (Piccoli) works for a rich, US producer (Palance) on a rewrite of Homer’s The Odyssey while his marriage is falling apart. The writer’s wife is played by Brigitte Bardot and Fritz Lang plays himself as the film’s director. Godard took happenings from his own life and threw them into this film within a film that you can find in our collection.

Contempt is playful, profound and shallow all at the same time. There are some amazing tracking shots that capture both the beauty of the stars and the splendor of Italy.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

New Book Recommendation: Traveling Prehistoric Seas: Critical Thinking on Ancient Transoceanic Voyages

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

 A book title of interest is: Traveling Prehistoric Seas: Critical Thinking on Ancient Transoceanic Voyages by Alice Beck Kohoe.
Call Number: 970.01 KEH

An extract from the publisher's website states:
Until recently the theory that people could have traversed large expanses of ocean in prehistoric times was considered pseudoscience. But recent discoveries in places as disparate as Australia, Labrador, Crete, California, and Chile open the possibility that ancient oceans were highways, not barriers, and that ancient people possessed the means and motives to traverse them. In this brief, thought-provoking, but controversial book Alice Kehoe considers the existing evidence in her reassessment of ancient sailing.

Friday, December 2, 2016

Library Services Affected by ICT's Major Maintenance Window

Hello JCU Library users
This weekend's ICT's major maintenance window impacts many library services.
Begins: 8pm AEST  2nd December
Finishes: 4pm AEST 4th December

  Status 12:30Pm Sunday 4th December

  • Readings & Past Exams available.
  • All library systems functioning normally.

Status 11:00am Sunday 4th December

  • Readings & Past Exams unavailable.
  • All other library systems functioning normally.

8:40pm Saturday 3rd December

  • Catalogue back online
  • Remote access still available (One Search, Find It, databases, ejournals & ebooks)
  • ResearchOnline & NQHeritage still available.
  • Readings & Past Exams unavailable.

5:40pm Saturday 3rd December

  • Remote access still available (One Search, Find It, databases, ejournals & ebooks)
  • ResearchOnline & NQHeritage still available.
  • Readings & Past Exams unavailable.
  • Catalogue unavailable.

 3:00pm Saturday 3rd December

  • Remote access still available (One Search, Find It, databases, ejournals & ebooks)
  • ResearchOnline & NQHeritage still available.
  • Readings & Past Exams available again.
  • Catalogue unavailable.

 1:30pm Saturday 3rd December

  • Remote access still available (One Search, Find It, databases, ejournals & ebooks)
  • ResearchOnline & NQHeritage still available.
  • Readings & Past Exams and Catalogue unavailable.

 9:30am Saturday 3rd December

  • Remote access still available (One Search, Find It, databases, ejournals & ebooks)
  • ResearchOnline & NQHeritage still available.
  • Readings & Past Exams and Catalogue unavailable.

7:46am Saturday 3rd December

 All services working normally except the Library Catalogue which cannot query the database or provide access to user accounts.

12:01am Saturday 3rd December

All services working normally except the Library Catalogue which cannot query the database or provide access to user accounts.
All Library services hosted on JCU servers and/or requiring access to JCU authentication systems are impacted, including:
  • Library Catalogue
  • Readings & Past Exams
  • Remote Access (Elibrary/EZproxy)
  • Research Online
  • NQHeritage
  • Interactive Forms/Libserver
Services not impacted (except when they require any of the above to be available) include:
  • LibGuides
  • Library Web Site
  • LibAnswers (FAQs)
  • Group Study Room Bookings
Externally hosted services that will be affected to some degree by the unavailability of remote access/JCU authentication services include:
  • One Search
  • Find It @ JCU Library
  • Databases, Ejournals and Ebooks
Some affected library services may be available within the maintenance window - we will list these on our @JCULibrary twitter feed and through the Library's System Status Management Dashboard as availability comes and goes.

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Things to do over the Christmas recess: Brush up your software skills with Lynda.com

The end of year break is here, but you only have the summer job and family festive season to keep you occupied. What else can you do to while away those vacant study hours?

Well, maybe you were wondering about why everybody else was able to embed a video into their Powerpoint so easily, or write a report with a great content table and headings on the exact same Word software as you? Do you have sudden urge to make your digital photos look awesome, or do you have SPSS as a component of your study next year?

At JCU, the library staff recommend you take full advantage of LYNDA.COM.

These are self directed learning  via video tutorials (with a transcript) across a range of topics. Free whilst enrolled at JCU but professionally educational in their tone.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

St Andrew's Day - 30 November 2016

St Andrew's Day is celebrated every year on 30th November. St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland and this day is a feast day celebrating Scottish culture, food and dance. It is the start of Scotland's winter festivals which includes Hogmanay and Burns Night.
St Andrew was actually one of the Twelve Apostles and was the brother of Peter. Scotland's national flag is St Andrew's Cross, the white diagonal cross on a blue background.
Credo, available through the JCU Library has a lot of great resources about St Andrew's Day if you want to find out more on this interesting subject.

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

New Book Recommendation: The Hands

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

 A book title of interest is: The Hands by Stephen Orr

An extract from the publisher's website states:
On a cattle station that stretches beyond the horizon, seven people are trapped by their history and the need to make a living. Trevor Wilkie, the good father, holds it all together, promising his sons a future he no longer believes in himself. The boys, free to roam the world's biggest backyard, have nowhere to go. Trevor's father, Murray, is the keeper of stories and the holder of the deed. Murray has no intention of giving up what his forefathers created. But the drought is winning. The cattle are ribs. The bills keep coming. And one day, on the way to town, an accident changes everything.
 

Friday, November 25, 2016

Referencing Q&A: Referencing Vetstream


We've had a question about referencing Vetstream for assignments, and it's a bit of a tricky one so we thought it was worth a longer answer here on the blog.

What's Vetstream?

To start with, if you're a Vet Sciences student or staff member and you haven't been using Vetstream, you should do yourself a favour and take at look at that database. It's one of the best resources for vets that we've seen.  It's kind of like a cross between a text-book, an encyclopedia, a suite of videos, a best-practice/current awareness service and a drug database.

Yes, that's right, it has drug database information for vets (look at the "Pharmacology and Therapeutics" section under each animal).

It currently only focuses on dogs, cats, rabbits and horses, but most of our students and academics will work with at least three of those animals, and it's worth exploring (remember folks, these things cost money and budgets are tight, so use it or lose it).

Referencing Vetstream
Vetstream Vetlexicon is essentially
four "books" bundled together
(Equis is missing from this logo)

Anyway, on to referencing.

Vetstream is one of those databases that are many, many things, and sometimes it can be difficult to figure out how to cite it in your assignment. It doesn't help that the name of the product we use has "Vetstream" written all over it, but it's actually called "Vetlexicon", and there are actually four segments which kind of are separate "books", but are all part of the same product...

The best advice we can give you is to treat it like an electronic encyclopediaActually, you should treat it like four electronic encyclopedias - Vetstream Vetlexicon CanisVetstream Vetlexicon FelisVetstream Vetlexicon Lupis, and Vetstream Vetlexicon Equis.

Then treat each entry based on what you can see.

If the entry has authors, use authors.  If it doesn't, skip straight to the title of the entry.

To help make things clearer, put a brief description of what type of thing (format) the entry actually is in square brackets after the title of the entry.

For example, here are two drug entries, the first one has an author, and the other one doesn't:

Senior, M. (2014). Pethidine [drug product summary]. In Vetstream Vetlexicon Equis. Retrieved from https://www.vetstream.com

→ In text this would look like this:  (Senior, 2014) OR Senior (2014).

Chloramine [drug product summary]. (2014). In Vetstream Vetlexicon Equis. Retrieved from https://www.vetstream.com

→ This one, in text, would look like this: ("Chloramine", 2014) OR "Chloramine" (2014).

The same goes for descriptions of breeds, images, procedure descriptions or anything else.

Robertson, H. (2014). Cesarean section: holding the cat [Image]. In Vetstream Vetlexicon Felis. Retrieved from https://www.vetstream.com

→ In text: (Robertson, 2014) OR Robertson (2014).

'Walking dandruff' (Cheyletiellosis) [Factsheet]. (2014). In Vetstream Vetlexicon Canis. Retrieved from https://www.vetstream.com

→ In text: ("Walking dandruff", 2014) OR "Walking dandruff" (2014).

Lofstedt, R., & Godfrey, D. (2014). Ovariohysterectomy [Procedure description]. In Vetstream Vetlexicon Felis. Retrieved from https://www.vetstream.com

→ In text: (Robertson, 2014) OR Robertson (2014).

So, it's actually quite easy to cite if you do it this way:

  1. treat each entry like an entry in an electronic encyclopedia, 
  2. give a brief description after the title, and
  3. treat each of the animal "books" as separate encyclopedias.

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Digital Literacy: 40,000 Years of Knowledge in 21st Century Land Management

The welcome page of STIPA features 
multimedia and Warlpiri Language
A long social and academic discussion has been going on around applying digital literacy, digital humanities, and bridging the digital divide in sharing information. The Warlpiri people form the Tanami desert region of Central Australia have tackled these issues with an online resource called the Southern Tanami Protected Area Story Book

Faced with government legislation and legal decisions that covers their traditional lands and how they manage it, and a complex range of issues and stakeholders, an Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) plan was set up. A written document in English and with some Warlpiri that is about 200 pages long was produced. The document discusses the current economic activities on the land ranging from pastoral to mining and traditional community activities. It outlines the community and other stakeholders various goals to achieve including; ensuring traditional culture is incorporated in its activities, maintaining the ecological diversity of the area, and minimise the impact of feral animals, climate change and modern economic activities, whilst ensuring stakeholders' economic sustainability.

In response to the above the document was made more accessible to the wider community as an online resource featuring videos in Warlpiri language. Some highlights for JCU students and staff are:
  • The overall layout and delivery for the target audience
  • Facts around traditional information like seasons, plants and animals and the local communities
  • Videos in Warlpiri language that explain aspects of the plan
  • The IPA document explaining in English the various cultural, community, business and legal aspects
All in all the Warlpiri people are doing interesting and new work in the area of digital humanities. Read more about it in the news story by Elke Weisman on First Nations Telegraph.

JCU Library YouTube Channel

Now that we’ve said good bye (and perhaps good riddance) to exams for the year, you may find yourself with more time on your hands. Why not stop by the JCU Library YouTube Channel? Our YouTube Channel includes videos on:
  • Top Library Tips 
  • JCU Library’s Special Collections 
  • Information Literacy 
  • Searching Databases. 
Take some time away from cats and cucumbers this summer to explore the JCU Library videos.
Here’s something from the Special Collections series to get you started.


Remember you can also find these videos on our Library Channel LibGuide.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

MLA is updating! EndNote users take note!

The Modern Languages Association has put out a new version of the famous (or is it infamous?) MLA Style Manual.

The 8th Edition has some genuine, ground breaking changes* compared to the previous editions, and we're now in the process of reading through the manual to work on creating a new MLA style LibGuide.

The current guide will be updated over the next few weeks (keep an eye out for when we switch from saying "7th edition" to "8th edition"), and a new guide should come out next year (unless we finish it earlier).

If you are an EndNote user, it's important to note that the style marked simply "MLA" in EndNote is the old version, but there is a new "MLA 8th" style available in the latest version of EndNote.

If you don't have "MLA 8th" available in your list of styles (when you hit "select another style"), then you will need to go to the Help menu in EndNote and click on "check for updates".

Make sure you close down all Office programs when you run an EndNote update, or it won't work (that includes Outlook). And Mac users, you'll need to quit out of every Office program properly - don't just close the window.

 The new style is currently a beta version, so there may be some bugs in it.  We recommend that you run EndNote updates regularly (say, at least once a semester), so you can get any new features that have come out.


*No, seriously, this is quite remarkable.  They've actually changed the internal logic behind the style, and it's flowing out in all sorts of directions.  Librarians all over the world are geeking out. 

Don't Forget to Check for Library Fines

If you are having trouble accessing your results for Semester 2, you may have a sanction due to things like an outstanding fee to pay, or a form you forgot to submit.

A lot of people don't realise that a library fine for overdue or lost books can result in a sanction. If you have fines that are $25 or more, your results will be withheld. It is an easy fix though, you can pay your fines in person or over the phone and then you will be able to access your results.

To check your library account to see if you have any fines (or any books still out that you need to return or renew), go to the Library homepage and log into your Library Account. You can then see any fines you have on you account and any items you have on loan.

Monday, November 21, 2016

Inter-campus Christmas tree competition, 2016

It may only be November, but one of our stellar InfoHelp Library Rovers only had a few hours left before leaving us forever, and bravely agreed to use that time by kicking off our Not-Exactly-Annual Inter-Campus Library Staff Christmas Tree Competition.

What happens is, every couple of years or so we make a Christmas tree (or something more creative) out of our print journals in the library.1, 2

Usually, Cairns wins.

Here's Townsville's entry for 2016, thanks to the efforts of our intrepid librarian Shannon, and our industrious rover Madi:


Cairns, the ball is in your court!


1. The last time we did this may or may not have been 2009, so the words "every couple of years or so" might be a tad "post-truth".
2. No print journal is harmed in the making of the tree3, all print journals are returned to their cosy spots after Christmas. If you need one we will carefully select a replacement volume for our tree and you will not go without.
3. The same cannot be said for the reverse situation. 

New eBook Recommendation: The Captain and "the Cannibal": An Epic Story of Exploration, Kidnapping and the Broadway Stage

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

 An ebook title of interest is: The Captain and "the Cannibal": An Epic Story of Exploration, Kidnapping and the Broadway Stage by James Fairhead.

An extract from the publisher's website states:
Sailing in uncharted waters of the Pacific in 1830, Captain Benjamin Morrell of Connecticut became the first outsider to encounter the inhabitants of a small island off New Guinea. The contact quickly turned violent, fatal cannons were fired, and Morrell abducted young Dako, a hostage so shocked by the white complexions of his kidnappers that he believed he had been captured by the dead. This gripping book unveils for the first time the strange odyssey the two men shared in ensuing years. The account is uniquely told, as much from the captive’s perspective as from the American’s.

Friday, November 18, 2016

Library Opening Hours: 18 November 2016 to 5 February 2017

The Library opening hours for the period 19 November 2016  to 5 February  2017.

Townsville:
18 November 2016- 20 November 2016
Friday 18 November       7.30am -5.00pm 
Saturday  19 November  1.00pm - 5.00pm
Sunday                            CLOSED

21 November 2016 - 5 February 2017
Monday - Friday           8.00am - 5.00pm


The 24 hour Information Commons will remain open.

Cairns:
18 November 2016- 20 November 2016
Friday 18 November        8am -5.00pm 
Saturday  19 November   1.00pm - 5.00pm
Sunday 20 November      CLOSED

21 November 2016 - 27 November 2016
Monday - Thursday     8.00am - 6.00pm
Friday                          8.00am to 5.00pm

28 November 2016 - 5 February 2017
Monday - Friday         8.00am - 5.00pm


The Townsville and Cairns libraries will be closed during the period between Christmas and New Year from the 24 December 2016 - 2 January 2017.


Thursday, November 17, 2016

Listen to the T150 Townsville Artists Interview Series on ABC North Qld's Morning Show with Paula Tapiolas

Throughout 2016, JCU Special Collections Librarian - Bronwyn McBurnie has introduced 9 of
the T150 Project - Townsville based artists to Paula Tapiolas, host of the Morning Show on ABC North Queensland (radio).

If you missed the live interviews then I have good news for you!  You can catch up by listening to the podcasts available from the ABC North Queensland website.

Find out more about these amazing artists (all JCU Alumni) who live and work in our community. Hear about how they get ideas, what matters to them and how living in the tropics impacts on their work.  You might be surprised at what they have to say.

Bronwyn McBurnie (pictured) - Special Collections Librarian really does love art and she would like thank all the artists who participated in this exciting, ground breaking series of interviews.  Sincere thanks also to Paula Tapiolas for her ongoing interest and support of JCU Library Special Collections.


ABC's Four Corners Online feature: Broken Homes

Humanites, social work, law, criminology, health and education students, researchers and lecturers will find the online companion for Four Corners report Broken Homes of interest. Creative Arts and Journalism students may find both the content and its presentation informative for their professional practice.

Four Corners has done an investigation into the current Child Safety and Removal policies in existence, including an increase in privately run corporate Residential Care homes. Exposing the damaged and at risk infants, children and youths who come into the care, and the opinions of carers, experts and investigators. An in depth discussion of one child's experience is revealed in what some might define as corrupt and negligent practices by both the private company management and government departmental oversight.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

T150 – Townsville Past & Present: Townsville On The Move

Don't miss the last round of T150 displays at James Cook University Library which focus on the theme “Townsville on the move”. Townsville was founded in 1864 as a port for the region’s emerging pastoral industry. The discovery of gold in the hinterland provided a catalyst for economic development and the settlement of Townsville as permanent town. The city soon became a transport hub for the products of the mining, sugar and cattle industries and the various displays in the cabinets reflect the development of roads, railways, airfields, shipping and port facilities in the region.

Carrier's camp at the top of Hervey Range.  Willmett & Wyeth Album, NQ Photographic Collection, NQID 423
In the 1860s the only road to the hinterland was via a track over the top of Hervey’s Range. The track over the range was steep and hazardous and took a full day for bullock drays to negotiate. The teams would spend one night at the Range Hotel at the base of Hervey’s Range before negotiating the range the following day and reaching the Eureka Hotel at the top by nightfall. The opening of a more serviceable road - Hervey’s Range Road - in April 1933 was described as a “red-letter day” for Townsville and district, and particularly for the tobacco growers who lived on the Range. The long-awaited road was expected to relieve much of the difficulty and expense involved in getting their produce to market.
Hauling timber logs, Mt Spec area. Townsville Album, NQ Photographic Collection, NQID 4561
In the 1930s the city council wanted to capitalise on the potential of the Mt Spec area by constructing a road up the Paluma Range. The scenic qualities of the rainforest and the difficulties of transporting timber and tin down the range were motivations for the construction of the road as an unemployment relief project in the Great Depression. During the Second World War, Paluma’s location high above Halifax Bay saw the establishment of radar stations, first by the American Army, then the Royal Australian Air Force. The area has a unique history intimately linked to Townsville. Displays feature items from the North Queensland Collection that document the development of the Mt Spec road, north of Townsville leading to the Paluma Range.

Pope Brothers Archive
Brothers, George Edward, Henry (Harry) James and Walter (Wally) John Pope, were all experienced coach and motor body builders and general wheelwrights. Using the slogan “We worked for others for you now let us work for you without the others,” they began their own operation as Pope Brothers in Townsville in June 1923. At that time, transport was making the transition from horses to motorised transport and the brothers believed Townsville offered a good business opportunity to which they could put their combined skills. The Pope Brothers Archive, which is part of the Library Archives Collection consists of workbooks, ledgers and journals. These valuable and fragile records span the period 1925 to 1938 and document the activities and financial takings of the business.
Walter John Pope & Henry James Pope, Pope Brothers Album, NQ Photographic Collection, NQID 21161.
Port
Gazetted a Port of Entry in 1865, the Port of Townsville has a rich history of supporting various industries and the local community with continuous employment. The Townsville Harbour Board was formed in 1896 and one of the first projects undertaken was the restoration of the eastern and western breakwaters, which had been extensively damaged in Cyclone Sigma. After providing facilities for coastal and overseas shipping at the outer harbour, the Harbour Board began developing the inner harbour, which included widening the entrance to Ross Creek. By 1900 the Port had developed a substantial meat export trade, wool was regularly shipped through Townsville, and the sugar trade was expanding. JCU Library holds the Townsville Harbour Board Archive - featuring reports of its activities from 1915 to the 1970s.
Townsville Harbour, E.R.Hayles Album, NQ Photographic Collection, NQID 3862
Tourism
In 1898 Robert Hayles visited Magnetic Island and was so impressed by its possibilities that he sold his other interests and built a hotel on the island the following year. Hayles built a jetty at Picnic Bay, and began operating a transport service from Townsville, with the small steam ferry Bee. Later, jetties were also built at Nelly Bay and Geoffrey Bay and the Hayles fleet continued to expand over many decades. Most of the Hayles vessels carried a name beginning with the letter ‘M’. The E.R. Hayles Archive was purchased from the estate of Eustace Robert (Bob) Hayles (son of Robert Hayles) and includes personal and business records.
Picnic Bay, Hayles Jetty, E.R.Hayles Album, NQ Photographic Collection, NQID 3987.
Local Government
A significant step in Townsville’s progressive history occurred in 2008 when the Queensland State Government forced the merger of Townsville City Council and Thuringowa City Council in order to create the new Townsville City we know today. The City of Thuringowa had its genesis in the Thuringowa Division, created on 11 November 1879 as one of 74 divisions around Queensland under the Divisional Boards Act 1879 with a population of 638. Displays feature correspondence dated 1897 covering a number of interesting matters, including the traffic at the Causeway and the offer from a citizen to build a cedar boat for life saving purposes during floods. These primary source documents are evidence that many matters of concern in the community never change, for example, road development and maintenance, and public transport. Items from the Thuringowa Shire Archive are currently awaiting a detailed listing which contains correspondence from pre-1900.


Monday, November 14, 2016

New Book Recommendation: Neonatal Nursing Care Handbook: An Evidence-Based Approach to Conditions and Proceedures

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

 A book title of interest is: Neonatal nursing care handbook: An evidence-based approach to conditions and procedures by Carole Kenner and Judy Wright Lott.

An extract from the publisher's website states:

 Neonatal nurses face an ever-changing practice landscape that requires swift decisions and actions. This is an up-to-date, comprehensive, quick reference resource written specifically for neonatal nurses throughout the globe. Designed for speedy information retrieval, it encompasses vital information about commonly encountered conditions and procedures on the neonatal unit. The handbook is written by outstanding neonatal practitioners in accessible language and consistently formatted for ease of use.

 Illustrations, diagrams and flow charts enhance information, which is divided into sections covering Systems Assessment and Management of Disorders, Special Care Considerations, and Procedures and Diagnostic Tests. Appendices deliver such valuable tools for clinical practice as a list of common abbreviations and pertinent web resources. Also included are downloadable, digital, patient management tools, reusable templates, and quick-reference calculation tools.

Key Features:
  • Provides quick-access, current information about common neonatal conditions and procedures
  • Assists neonatal nurses in making sound clinical decisions 
  • Written by prominent leaders in the neonatal field
  • Delivers information concisely and clearly for neonatal nursing staff and APs worldwide
  • Enhances content with illustrations, diagrams, and flow charts and digital patient management and calculation tools

Friday, November 11, 2016

"I have tried in my way to be free". Leonard Cohen (1934-2016).

A sad start to the weekend for music and poetry lovers. Singer-songwriter, poet, and writer, Leonard Cohen passed away today. He is well known for songs such as Suzanne, Bird on a Wire, Everybody Knows and most famously various covers of his song Hallelujah. From Canada, he started out as a poet but apparently moved to music as he couldn't make any money writing poetry.  With lines like, "Like a bird on the wire, Like a drunk in a midnight choir, I have tried in my way to be free", we can be happy that his craft was able to reach such a wide audience through popular music.

Our library staff reflected today with anecdotes about concerts they attended, their favourite song and the first time they heard his music. One staff member can remember when her friend bought an LP album to school and said "Listen to this".

He published one novel - Beautiful Losers, before his music career took of. You will find it at shelf number: 820C COH 1C BEA.

Remembrance Day 11 November 2016

"At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month we will remember them".
Remembrance Day is observed every year on 11th November. There is a minute silence at the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month in memory of those who served and those who died in all wars and armed conflicts. This time marks the armistance of World War 1 when the war offically ended in 1918 and 2016 is the 98th anniversary.
The Australian War Memorial has further information about the commemoration of this day. If you are interested in learning more about Remembrance Day the Library has many resources including the eBook Remembrance Today: Poppies Grief and Heroism.

Thursday, November 10, 2016

BioOne Revamp and Search Tips!

BioOne Complete is the new title given to the previously separate databases BioOne.1 and BioOne.2 and now is listed as such on the Library’s A-Z Databases Page.

BioOne Complete provides primary research in organismal biology, ecology, zoology, and environmental science. Subjects covered include agriculture, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, developmental biology, fisheries, forestry, genetics, geology, marine & freshwater biology, microbiology, ornithology, palaeontology, and veterinary sciences. With over 135,000 full text articles from 191 different titles, BioOne Complete is a valuable resource for anyone in the biological, ecological, zoological, or environmental science fields.

If you haven’t used BioOne Complete before, check out the instructional videos on how to use the Basic Search or Advanced Search options. A quick start guide can also be accessed here. JCU users can also create a personal login on the platform, which will allow you to save articles to a favourites list, save searches, set up alerts for when new content is posted, track citations on specific articles, and download citations via selected citation manager programs such as EndNote. For instructions on how to set up your account and access these features, see the Creating a BioOne Complete Account guide.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Chat with the Library from Facebook!

For those of you who love a good Chat, you’ll be pleased to hear that you can now use the Library’s Chat service directly from Facebook. You can finally ask all those burning library related questions you have without leaving the comfort of Facebook (and its cats).



It’s simple to do. Select the Send Message button underneath the Cover Photo and type in your question in the pop-up window that appears. Send it off and you’ll soon be hearing from one of your friendly librarians.

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

New Book Recommendation: Freedom Without Permission; Bodies and Space in the Arab Revolutions

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

 A book title of interest is: Freedom without permission; Bodies and space in the Arab Revolutions edited by Frances S. Hasso and Zakia Salime

An extract from the publisher's website states:

As the 2011 uprisings in North Africa reverberated across the Middle East, a diverse cross section of women and girls publicly disputed gender and sexual norms in novel, unauthorized, and often shocking ways. In a series of case studies ranging from Tunisia's 14 January Revolution to the Taksim Gezi Park protests in Istanbul, the contributors to Freedom without Permission reveal the centrality of the intersections between body, gender, sexuality, and space to these groundbreaking events. Essays include discussions of the blogs written by young women in Egypt, the Women2Drive campaign in Saudi Arabia, the reintegration of women into the public sphere in Yemen, the sexualization of female protesters encamped at Bahrain's Pearl Roundabout, and the embodied, performative, and artistic spaces of Morocco's 20 February Movement. Conceiving of revolution as affective, embodied, spatialized, and aesthetic forms of upheaval and transgression, the contributors show how women activists imagined, inhabited, and deployed new spatial arrangements that undermined the public-private divisions of spaces, bodies, and social relations, continuously transforming them through symbolic and embodied transgressions.

Friday, November 4, 2016

New Book Recommendation: A Mind for Numbers

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

A book title of interest is:
A Mind For Numbers: How To Excel At Math And Science (Even If You Flunked Algebra) by Barbara Oakley
Call Number: 501.9 OAK 

An extract from the publisher's website states:

The companion book to COURSERA®’s wildly popular massive open online course “Learning How to Learn”

Whether you are a student struggling to fulfill a math or science requirement, or you are embarking on a career change that requires a new skill set, A Mind for Numbers offers the tools you need to get a better grasp of that intimidating material. Engineering professor Barbara Oakley knows firsthand how it feels to struggle with math. She flunked her way through high school math and science courses, before enlisting in the army immediately after graduation. When she saw how her lack of mathematical and technical savvy severely limited her options—both to rise in the military and to explore other careers—she returned to school with a newfound determination to re-tool her brain to master the very subjects that had given her so much trouble throughout her entire life.

Got Your Exam Plan Sorted?

About a month ago we held the Exam Plan Fair on both the Cairns and Townville campuses. Some of you might remember the dogs, the crocodile or the mindfulness activities with the chocolate and shaving cream (don't worry we kept them separate).

Do you remember the Exam Plan booklet that was handed out? This is a very useful booklet, full of tips on surviving and thriving during the exam period.

Now is the perfect time to check it out! Again!

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Global Plants

Studying Ecology, Botany, or just interested in plants? If you’re not already using Global Plants, you should be!

Global Plants is a veritable treasure trove for anyone involved in botany, ecology, or conservation studies. The database is comprised of over two million plant type specimens, 160,000+ partner contributed reference works and collectors' diaries, and over 20,000 paintings, drawings, and photographs.

Find collections such as the Drawings of the Royal Botanical Expedition to the Viceroyalty of Peru, discover sketches and watercolours from Cook’s first expedition aboard the HMS Endeavor in the Cook First Voyage Artwork Collection, check out the Economic Botany Collection, Kew, containing examples of anthropogenically useful parts of plants, and browse collections of flora by country or region, such as the New Caledonia and Vanuatu plants collection.

JSTOR has recently added a free, public Global Plants LibGuide. Find out what Global Plants is all about, get quick, easy access to what’s new on the platform, read about features and learn how to use the site, and even search for plant specimens from within the LibGuide itself.

Global Plants is a valuable resource for all those interested in, studying, or researching plants. Make sure you're not missing out on all it has to offer and check it out today!

Sunday, October 30, 2016

New Book Recommendation: Leading & Managing Occupational Therapy Services

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

 A book title of interest is:
 Leading & managing occupational therapy services / Brent Braveman.
Call number: 362.178068 BRA 2016

An extract from the publisher's website states:
Put theory and research into practice for real-world success. Here’s your introduction to the use of theory, research, and evidence in guiding your practice as an occupational therapy manager. From leadership and supervision to policies, program development, and continuous quality improvement, you’ll find complete coverage of the full range of issues and functions managers encounter in the real worlds in which they practice. Whatever your role, the practical knowledge and the guidance you’ll find here will help you become a more effective OT, colleague, and manager.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016

Jean-Pierre Sauvage.

J. Fraser Stoddart.

Ben L. Feringa.

Are these names familiar? No? Well, they should be!

Sauvage, Stoddart, and Feringa are the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2016 winners. They were awarded the Prize for designing and building molecules that can be controlled to accomplish a task when supplied with energy. Read more about their research and what it means at C&EN: Molecular machines garner 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

ACS (the American Society of Chemistry) has made ten articles cited by the Nobel Prize Foundation in the winner's announcement open access. However, as JCU users you have full access to all of the ACS journals through the library's subscription. Simply find it on the A-Z Databases page or head straight to the site - ACS Publications.

ACS journals provide access to groundbreaking chemistry research with a virtual smorgasbord of peer reviewed research articles across chemical and related sciences. Along with the 10 articles cited by the Nobel Prize Foundation, Stoddart has published 267 articles in ACS journals, while Feringa and Sauvage have published 205 and 121 respectively. And that is just three renowned researchers among the thousands whose research is available to you at the click of a few buttons.

If you're studying chemistry or related sciences, head over to ACS journals now and make full use of the world of research that is open to you. Who knows - maybe you'll be making the next big discovery one day, and it will be your name and research highlighted at the Nobel Prize awards!