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Showing posts from June, 2018

52 Book Challenge - Week 26

It's Week 26 of the 52 Book Reading Challenge, which means we are now half-way through the year. I'll pause for a moment while you hyperventilate.

Are you reconciled with the inexorable passage of time? Good.

Now, this week's challenge is one you can work out on your own, but the second half of the year (i.e., next week) kicks off with a doozy, so we'll give you some ideas for that one, too.

The current challenge is:

26.  A book you were supposed to read in school but haven’t yet.

Look, only you know what homework you skipped in school, so this is on you. If you were the kind of person who read everything and then some, then ask other people for suggestions of books they were supposed to read, but didn't. Or, pick a book everyone else was reading that you decided was not for you. Hopefully you'll come up with something new and exciting.

Next week's challenge will take some planning:

27. A book with a character with your first name.

Some people have easy name…

52 Reading Challenge Week 25 - An Award-Winning Book

Save Your Searches in One Search!

Ever had a great search that you wanted to save within One Search? Now you can. You can save a search today that you can revisit tomorrow on any computer.

To use the Saved Searches feature in One Search, you will need to have a Google Account. If you have signed in to Google products like YouTube or Gmail, you may already have an account.

Have any eagle-eyed people noticed the star icons that now appear in One Search? That’s how you get started saving your searches.




Enter you search in One Search and select the star icon that appears within the search box to get started. Step-by-step instructions on how to save your searches can be found online.

*If you are using a public computer, we recommend signing out of your Google account when you have finished your session.

Happy searching.

Advanced Endnote Training: Townsville Friday 22 June

Advanced EndNote training in Townsville 

When: Friday 22 June, 9am to 11am

Where: Building 142 (The Science Place), Room 020 & 021

This workshop is designed for all postgraduates, HDRs and researches, particularly those doing systematic reviews. The workshop will cover:
Organising records into groups Annotating recordsChecking for duplicate records Creating custom fields in references Sharing EndNote libraries Attaching full text articles to records Exporting results to Excel  Please note: You are expected to have basic knowledge of how EndNote works.

Registration for all workshops: https://libcal.jcu.edu.au/calendar/workshops

52 Book Challenge - Week 25

Do you know how many book/literary awards are out there in the world?  A lot.

There are the big guns like the Nobel, the Man Booker, the Pulitzer, the Miles Franklin, the Vogel... and that's just the type of the iceberg for the English language alone.

We usually make a point of getting the finalists for the Children's Book Council of Australia awards and the winners of the Miles Franklin and Man Booker prizes, and we tend to grab a few more award winners (and some of the short listers) from various other literary awards as well.

Which is handy, because this week's Reading Challenge is:

25. An award-winning book.

So find yourself a book that tickled some judges' fancies, and get reading!

World Refugee Day June 20th, 2018

June 20th is the United Nations World Refugee Day. UN statistics for 2016 had 65.6 million people as displaced both internally and to other countries, with the full report providing further detail. The Australia Refugee Council has Australian statistics around our national involvement and also the Australian Federal Government  website has national policy and details.

The United Nations official page states:

In a world where violence forces thousands of families to flee for their lives each day, the time is now to show that the global public stands with refugees. To do this, the UN Refugee Agency launched the #WithRefugees petition in June 2016 to send a message to governments that they must work together and do their fair share for refugees. On World Refugee Day, held every year on June 20th, we commemorate the strength, courage and perseverance of millions of refugees. This year, World Refugee Day also marks a key moment for the public to show support for families forced to flee.

Reading Challenge Week 24 - A Book Set Somewhere You’ll Visit This Year

Oooh! A Special Guest Reviewer! Kimberley Blyth has been doing a library placement with us in Cairns*, and she has chipped in this week with a review for the Reading Challenge.

This week's challenge involves finding a book set somewhere you'll be visiting this year. Did you find a book set in your chosen destination? Did it make you more or less keen to visit?



Kimberley Blyth read Gap Year in Ghost Town by Michael Pryor.

Somewhere I hope to visit this year is Melbourne. According to the Global Liveability Report for 2017, it’s one of the world’s most liveable cities, vibrant and full of culture, so I’d love to experience it for myself. Michael Pryor’s Gap Year in Ghost Town (820.94 PRY in the Curriculum Collection) showcases inner city Melbourne through the eyes of the narrator, Anton Marin. From the first scene, the reader is transported to the lively back alleys and attractions of Melbourne, and you can tell it's the author's hometown because the little details made th…

Have you found APO yet?

APO (Analysis and Policy Observatory) contains a wealth of documentation relating to Australian public policy research. Subject areas covered include:
HealthEducationIndigenousPoliticsScienceCulture, and more. APO is updated daily, so you will be able to access the latest in policy knowledge and evidence. The platform is a great sources for grey literature.

You will also find the APO weblink in JCU Library's A-Z Database list.

Systematic Reviews Workshops, Townsville: 13-22 June

JCU Library is facilitating a series of workshops to support beginning a systematic review or literature review using a systematic protocol. Workshops will be held from 13-22 June on the Townsville campus.

Who should attend? 

HDRs (contributes to professional development) HDR supervisors Researchers considering conducting a systematic review Academics teaching systematic reviews Staff interested in systematic reviews 
To get the most benefit from the workshops, please have a topic ready to work on; you should have a working protocol established after attending all sessions. The Advanced search methods and Test your protocol workshops are split into qualitative and quantitative review sessions. These workshops are open to staff and HDRs only and are face to face.

Click on the poster below to see more information regarding topics, dates and how to register. Register now as places are limited. For further enquiries, contact the library; or email Sam.Rannard@jcu.edu.au, Claire.Ovaska@jcu.e…

52 Book Challenge - Week 24

How has your holiday planning been going? Are you going somewhere interesting this year? Or, at least, somewhere that someone might have used as a setting for a book?

The 24th challenge in the 52 Book Reading Challenge is:

24. A book set somewhere you’ll visit this year.

As with all of these challenges, we strongly recommend having fun with it.* Feel free to turn it upside-down and inside-out to get the most interesting, fun or just plain enjoyable book you can find.

Oh, and we're willing to be flexible - it can be a place you have already visited this year, so you don't have to limit yourself to future holiday locations.

Have fun (both with the book, and on your trip)!


*We recommend finding as much joy as possible in all of the assignments you'll be given during your time at university - it's always best if you can figure out how to get the most out of them for your edification and personal growth.

Have you missed out on hearing about the 52 Book Challenge? Catch up her…

Reading Challenge Week 23 - A Book by someone from Another Country

Ah, other countries. There are quite a lot of them. At last count, there were an in-determinant number of countries (a few haven't been officially recognised) over the 190 mark. That's at least 190 options for finding an author who isn't from here. Wherever "here" is.

A good reading challenge will give you the option to broaden your horizons, so whether you chose a writer from far away or right next door, we hope this challenge gave you a chance to explore something new.


Scott Dale read The Buried Giantby Kazuo Ishiguro.

English readers of this book who don’t know Ishiguro might assume they are reading something translated from Japanese but that is not the case. Kazuo Ishiguro was born in Japan but moved to England with his family at an early age. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2017 with the Academy acknowledging that Ishiguro, “in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world”.

That…

Systematic Reviews Workshops, Cairns: 14 - 27 June

JCU Library is facilitating a series of workshops to support beginning a systematic review or literature review using a systematic protocol. Workshops will be held from 14-27 June on the Cairns campus.
Who should attend? HDRs (contributes to professional development)HDR supervisorsResearchers considering conducting a systematic reviewAcademics teaching systematic reviewsStaff interested in systematic reviews To get the most benefit from the workshops, please have a topic ready to work on; you should have a working protocol established after attending all sessions. The Advanced search methods and Test your protocol workshops are split into qualitative and quantitative review sessions. These workshops are open to staff and HDRs only and are face to face.

Click on the poster below to see more information regarding topics, dates and how to register. Register now as places are limited.
For further enquiries, contact the library; or email Janet.Catterall@jcu.edu.au or Bronwen.Forster@jcu.edu…

52 Book Challenge - Week 23

It's time to think beyond your shores! Wherever you are right now, there's one simple truth that cannot be denied: there are other countries out there, and those countries have writers.

The Reading Challenge for this week is:
23. A book by someone from another country
Pick a country, any country! Just not the one you happen to be standing in right now. 
Unless you are in Antarctica. We're happy to accept any book written by a native Antarctican, just because we've never read a book written by a penguin before.

By the way, the next challenge requires you to get your holiday or conference plans sorted out, as you'll need to read a book set somewhere you'll visit this year. So get cracking!

Have you missed out on hearing about the 52 Book Challenge? Catch up here.

Reading Challenge Week 22 - A Memoir or Journal

Memoirs, journals and diaries - they're all true stories, told from the perspective of the person who lived through those events. A memoir looks back at those events from older eyes, but a journal or a diary was probably written right in the thick of it, so the formats provide different perspectives.

Autobiographies are a step removed again. They tend to tell the story in the bigger picture of a person's whole life, while memoirs are sharply focused on a particular part of that life, or on particular events that happened. Depending, of course, on who wrote them, they can all be thoroughly fascinating to read.

Which is why we hope you found something fascinating for this week's Reading Challenge. We did.


Brenda Carter read The illustrated Pepys: Extracts from the diary, by Samuel Pepys (edited by Robert Latham).

These days memoirs are usually written for public consumption, but Samuel Pepys wrote only for himself.Written between 1660 and 1669, The illustrated Pepys: Extracts …