Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Featured eBooks: Veterinary science

100 Top Consultations in Small Animal General Practice. Focusing on 'day one competencies', this book offers essential guidance to the most common problems encountered in small animal general practice. This book is ideal for the undergraduate or newly qualified vet, and for those seeking an up-to-date refresher.
Bovine Anatomy: An illustrated text. This unique atlas on Bovine Anatomy combines the advantages of both topographical and systems based methods of anatomy. Each page of text faces a full page of realistic illustrations in colour. The topographical treatment of parts of the body is accompanied by illustrations of the bones, joints, muscles, organs, blood vessels, nerves, and lymph nodes of each part. Information tables on the muscles, lymph nodes, and peripheral nerves provide brief data referenced to the text.


Long Distance Transport and Welfare of Farm Animals. Long-distance transport can cause both physical and mental problems in animals and promoting animal welfare will be beneficial to both the animals and the agricultural and processing industries. This volume brings together studies from well-known animal scientists and researchers to reviews the implications and necessity of long-distance animal transport for slaughter. Authoritative reports on regional practices are combines with discussions of the science, economics, legislation and procedures involved in this practice.



Management of Disease in Wild Mammals. Wildlife populations may be a significant source of infection for humans and domestic animals while in some cases being themselves endangered by pathogens. The development of sustainable approaches to the management of wildlife diseases is fundamental to the protection of human health, agriculture, and endangered species. Managing disease in free-ranging wild mammals presents serious challenges, however, because of their often complex ecology and social behavior, which can undermine simplistic assumptions about the dynamics of disease and responses to intervention.

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