Thursday, June 28, 2012

Featured eBooks: Cinema

Blood money: A history of the first teen slasher film cycle. This book is a remarkable piece of scholarship that highlights the many forces that helped establish the teen slasher as a key component of the North American film industry’s repertoire of youth-market product.









Brutal intimacy: Analyzing contemporary French cinema. This book is the first book to explore the fascinating films of contemporary France, ranging from mainstream genre spectaculars to arthouse experiments, and from wildly popular hits to films that deliberately alienate the viewer. Twenty-first-century France is a major source of international cinema-diverse and dynamic, embattled yet prosperous-a national cinema offering something for everyone.





Indie: An American film culture. America's independent films often seem to defy classification. Their strategies of storytelling and representation range from raw, no-budget projects to more polished releases of Hollywood's "specialty" divisions. Yet understanding American indies involves more than just considering films. Filmmakers, distributors, exhibitors, festivals, critics, and audiences all shape the art's identity, which is always understood in relation to the Hollywood mainstream.








Jane Campion: Authorship and personal cinema. This book explores the dynamics of the creative process involved in cinematic representation in the films of Jane Campion, one of the most highly regarded of contemporary filmmakers. Utilizing a wealth of new material—including interviews with Campion and her sister and personal writings of her mother—Fox traces the connections between the filmmaker’s complex background and the thematic preoccupations of her films, from her earliest short, Peel, to 2009’s Bright Star. He establishes how Campion’s deep investment in family relationships informs her aesthetic strategies, revealed in everything from the handling of shots and lighting, to the complex system of symbolic images repeated from one film to the next.

No comments: