Sunday, August 4, 2013

Feature eBooks: Migration

Asylum seekers and immigration detention. The record rate of unauthorised and unsafe boat arrivals on Australian shores has further fuelled the longstanding asylum seeker debate and prompted the federal government to seek an effective solution to a seemingly intractable border control problem. The government’s recent policy backdown which resulted in the reintroduction of offshore processing for asylum seekers while at the same increasing the annual refugee intake, has drawn both praise and condemnation. Should Australia ‘turn back the boats’ of the so-called ‘queue jumpers’ to deter the unsafe and unscrupulous practices of people smugglers? Should Australia maintain offshore processing in other countries such as Nauru and Papua New Guinea (Manus Island), or process asylum seekers onshore in Australia? What are Australia’s obligations to asylum seekers under the Refugee Convention and under its own laws? Is the practice of prolonged mandatory detention adding further trauma to the lives of people who may have already fled from desperate situations in their homelands?

Does history matter? Making and debating citizenship, immigration and refugee policy in Australia and New Zealand. This volume of essays represents the first systematic attempt to explore the use of the past in the making of citizenship and immigration policy in Australia and New Zealand. Focussing on immigration and citizenship policy in Australia and New Zealand, the contributions to this volume explore how history and memory are implicated in policy making and political debate, and what processes of remembering and forgetting are utilised by political leaders when formulating and defending policy decisions. They remind us that a nuanced understanding of the past is fundamental to managing the politics and practicalities of immigration and citizenship in the early 21st century.

Migration, health and inequality. This book highlights recent developments in the areas of migration, human rights and health from a range of countries. Looking at diverse health issues, from HIV to reproductive and maternal health, and a variety of forms of migration, including asylum-seeking, labour migration and trafficking, it exposes the factors that contribute to the vulnerability of different mobile groups as they seek to uphold their wellbeing. This timely and unique collection argues that we need to look beyond host country responses and biomedical frameworks and include both the role of transnational health networks and indigenous, popular or lay ideas about health when trying to understand why many migrants suffer from poor health relative to their host population. It offers a broad range of linkages between migrant agency, transnationalism and diaspora mechanisms and looks at the impact of migrant health on the health and rights of those communities that are left behind.

The multicultural dilemma: Migration, ethnic politics, and state intermediation. This work seeks to explore the contemporary challenge of government in multicultural societies, drawing together a wide range of contributors to examine how ethnic difference could better understood and mediated by modern nation states. Divided into three sections, the book centres round the notion that changing patterns of migration bring escalating obstacles to integration or assimilation. 

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