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How To Be a Successful Student (Ask Questions)

 In the first few weeks of Semester you'll learn all sorts of tips and tricks for success in your studies. There's one tip that we think is probably the most important one you'll ever hear:

Ask questions.

Nobody expects you to know everything already, so don't worry about asking lots of questions. The more questions you ask, the more you'll be able to prepare for the challenges university can present.

There are help desks and chat services all over the university, so whether you're on campus or not, you can find a place where someone is willing to answer your questions. And usually, if they can't answer it, they can point you towards someone else who might be able do. So, wherever you are, find a help desk or a chat button and ask your questions!

In the Library, we have Library Help Desks on the ground floor of both buildings. During our Services Hours, you can just pop in and talk to whoever is there. But if you aren't on the ground floor of the library building, you can still contact our Library Help services by using our Chat buttons. They pop up all over the place on many of our web pages and all of our Library Guides, and you can always get to it from our Contacts page.

And don't forget, you can also get help with your assignments from the Learning Centre, which also has a help desk located in the Library Buildings, and a Chat service run when the Peer Advisors are available. Student Equity and Wellbeing are also located in the Library Buildings, and they're happy to answer any questions you want to ask them - as are Careers and Employment... there really are a lot of support services available for you, and you can find out where most of them are and what they can do for just by asking.

So just ask.

Successful Students Ask Questions!



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