Thursday, January 28, 2016

Student Printing Queue Outage January 28th 2016

At present ITR has informed the JCU community:

Any printing or scanning service that requires you to swipe your card at the printer will not be working, including staff-secure printing, student printing, scan to mail.

What do I need to do? Please monitor Central Computing Bulletins for further updates and contact the IT Help Desk if you are experiencing any additional issues and require assistance.

You can also follow the Library Facebook page where library staff will post updates as well.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

January 27th International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust

January 27th is a United Nations day of observance for the International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust.

On the United Nations website it states:

The theme for the Holocaust remembrance and education activities in 2016, including the Holocaust Memorial Ceremony, is “The Holocaust and Human Dignity”. The theme links Holocaust remembrance with the founding principles of the United Nations and reaffirms faith in the dignity and worth of every person that is highlighted in the United Nations Charter, as well as the right to live free from discrimination and with equal protection under the law that is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Holocaust, which resulted in the destruction of nearly two thirds of European Jewry, remains one of the most painful reminders of the international community’s failure to protect them.

This United Nations websites also has links to a variety of resources including downloadable educational material like Why teach about the Holocaust? It discusses the effect not only on the Jewish victims and survivors but also all the other peoples who suffered under the Nazi polices like the Roma, Poles, Soviet prisoners of war, disabled people, homosexuals and Jehovah's Witnesses. It provides details of how this terrible period has influenced the formation of the UN, UNESCO objectives, International Laws and Human Rights agreements. It has prompted continued reflection on the importance of issues based around the social construct of race and religious, ethnic and human rights, asylum seeking and government policy versus popular opinion and the importance of individual, state and society responsibility to protect human rights. These matters are still very relevant today where we continue to have instability generated by  warfare, natural disaster and economic activity and human action and ideologies that violate basic human rights.

You can read the UN Secretary-General's message for 2016.

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Library Opening Hours: 1st of February to 21st February 2016

The libraries on Cairns and Townsville campuses are open from February 1st to February 21st, 2016 at the following times:

Townsville Eddie Koiki Mabo Library 

Monday to Friday 8.00 am to 5.00 pm

Tuesday*             8.00 am to 7.00pm

Saturday             1.00 pm to 5.00pm

Sunday                 CLOSED

Cairns Campus Library 

Monday to Friday  8.00 am to 5.00 pm

Saturday              1.00 pm to 5.00pm

Sunday                 CLOSED

Check out the Opening Hours website for further library hours.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

New Book Recommendation: Education integration challenges: The case of Australian Muslims

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software

A title of interest this week is:

Education integration challenges: The case of Australian Muslims, edited by Dr. Abe W. Ata.
Call number: 305.6970994 EDU
 
A summary of the book states:
A collections of essays from different perspectives that explore issues and challenges for Muslim communities in Australia after September 11.

As a JCU library reviewer I noted some of the essays are related to education and are Australian specific issues but they range across topics as diverse as gender, employment, sexuality, crime and the justice system, multiculturalism, integration, assimilation and acculturation, and society perceptions both from the Muslim Australian community and of the wider Australian society. The title would be of interest to a range of disciplines.



Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Opening hours: Australia Day Public Holiday 26th January 2016

James Cook University Libraries in Townsville and Cairns will be closed for the Australia Day public holiday on Tuesday the 26th of January 2016.

The Libraries will be open Monday the 25th January, 2016 and the Townsville 24 hour Information Commons will remain accessible on Australia Day. See the full library opening hours online.

New students to JCU will find there are normally community events held on the public holiday. Check out the Australia Day website for Queensland to see if there are any events in your area. You can also tweet and follow tweets this year as part of a time capsule.

Friday, January 15, 2016

Post-avant-garde David Bowie

Blackstar cover; Bowie's 25th album
If you are watching Rage's six hour video marathon on David Bowie tonight and are inspired to discover or rediscover the depth and breadth of his influence, check out your library collection. Study of David Bowie's creativity fits across many disciplines.

Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes:David Bowie Is and the Stream of Warm Impermanence - a review of the touring exhibition
     (The) twentieth-century avant-garde influence on a  
     post-avant-garde Bowie is implicit in some of the exhibits
     included in David Bowie Is. In its display of a "verbasizer": a
     computer program that Bowie developed with Ty Roberts in
     1995 (for use on his underrated Outside album of the same   
     year. The programme is fed sentences from sources of any sort
     (news stories, journal entries,poetic musings) and then randomly rearranges the words it receives
     into new phrases that can be used to compose or inspire song lyrics. The process is a digitization  
     of a technique Bowie had been employing for years: the "cut-up" method. This involved using
     material print sources (newspapers, advertisements, poems) that Bowie literally cut up and
     rearranged into new and random configurations. He copied the technique from Burroughs, who 
     had taken it from his friend Brion Gysin, but who also recognized its origin in the collage
     techniques of Berlin dada (Murray, 2013)

Confronting Inauthenticity - Utopias of David Bowie
     The utopia of Bowie's work is not only situated in rejecting the normative gender and sexuality
     categories but also in rejecting the superficial realism that is often appropriated to artists as their
     specific voice and virtue. We are then given a brief overview of Bowie’s construction of his
     various visual identities, which shows how Bowie rejected the realism of the street in 1960s
     England – mostly inspired by the low-budget science fiction films of the time (Parunov, 2015)

Hallo Spaceboy: The Rebirth of David Bowie
     "Let's Dance put me in an extremely different orbit... artistically and aesthetically." Bowie said.
     "It seemed obvious that the way to make money was to give people what they want, so I gave
     them what they wanted, and it dried me up."
     In the past he had always followed his own musical instincts, "stubborn, obscure, confrontational
     in my own indulgent way." The results, the glam slam of Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane, the
     soul of Young Americans.., established him among the most creative, and creatively brilliant artists
     in rock 'n' roll history (Thompson, 2006, pp. 4-5).

Students of literature might be interested in David Bowie's reading list, featured earlier this week on the library's Facebook page. Bowie read and enjoyed Camus' The Stranger, Orwell's 1984, and McEwan's In Between the Sheets (among many others) and these are available in the University collection for you to read.




Wednesday, January 13, 2016

Book Review: The Greatest Gatsby, by Tohby Riddle



What do you get when an illustrator borrows his mum's old type-writer, pulls out a box of stamps and tries his hand at explaining the basics of English grammar?

The Greatest Gatsby: A Visual Book of Grammar, by Tohby Riddle.

The book ostensibly explains grammar by illustrating the concepts, but it is really more of a celebration than an explanation.  I'm something of a grammar nut myself, and I thoroughly enjoyed seeing how Riddle found visually striking ways to illustrate the way language works.... but I'm not entirely sure anyone who was new to grammatical terms would gain a firm understanding of the subject from this book.  I'm also not entirely sure that matters.

This book is a feast for the eyes - especially for anyone with a fondness for old stationary.  Much of the text was created using an old ribbon type-writer, but some of it was created with stamps and letters taken from an old press.

Stamps - proper rubber stamps of things like trains, bicycles and pandas - feature heavily in the design, as do pages from ledgers, index cards and graph paper.  Many of the other illustrations are collages of images only a genius or a madman would construct.  And, almost as icing on the cake, there are also drawings and sketches.


This book is one of those rare birds that defy easy categorisation.  It is an illustrated book that looks a lot like a children's book, but probably has more to offer an older audience.  It's a book about language which is more striking for the images than the words.  

It's going to be tucked away in the English language section (call number 425 RID), but it is a must-read for anyone interested in illustration and design.  Anyone who might be looking in the Curriculum Collection for interesting ways to explain grammar would also benefit from seeking out this book in the Main Collection.

If you like words and looking at the way language works, read this book.  If you like art and design, read this book.  If you like stink bugs and airships, read this book. 

If this book was written entirely in Ancient Greek, it would still be worth reading.

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Finding textbook for JCU

Do you need to find which textbooks you require for your subjects? Your required textbook should be in your subject outline, located in LearnJCU.

Textbooks for JCU subjects can also be searched on the Co-op book shop website by clicking the Uni Text List button to get to the textbook search, filter to JCU Townsville or Cairns campus, select the semester and then the subject code.

JCU libraries in Cairns and Townsville have copies of all required textbook.

Monday, January 11, 2016

New Book Recommendation: Cronin's key guide to Australian wildflowers

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

A title of interest this week is:

Cronin's key guide to Australian wildflowers by Leonard Cronin.
Call number: 582.130994 CRO 2016

An extract from the publisher's website states:

Featuring approximately 600 species from all parts of the country, this is a handy reference for identifying Australian wildflowers. This is both a field guide for travellers and a reference book for the home library. It covers more than 590 wildflowers from all parts of the continent. Each species is beautifully illustrated and described in clear, concise language including leaves, flowers, fruit, flowering season and habitat. There is a distribution maps for every species.

Friday, January 8, 2016

Book Review: On Writing, by Stephen King

Not long ago we reviewed a book called How to Write A Lot, by Paul Silvia.  Silvia's book was concerned with writing research papers as a professional academic, and his main piece of advice was to schedule time for writing, set realistic goals and make a point of sticking to your schedule and working towards those goals (hardly rocket science, but still quite revolutionary if you're the kind of person who can never "find time" to write).

Silvia frequently referenced another book in his writing, one concerned with writing fiction:  On Writing, by Stephen King.

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft is a peculiar book.  It actually contains several shorter "books" reflecting different aspects of Stephen King's relationship to the craft of writing.

It begins with what King refers to as his "CV" - a relatively straight-forward memoir which tells the story of his childhood, teenage years and early career, and charts his development as a writer.  In this section, King notes some of the core pieces of advice he received as he submitted various stories to newspapers and magazines, and notes how following this advice improved his writing greatly.

The next section is more of a nuts-and-bolts look at the craft of writing.  He offers advice on how to construct and write sentences and paragraphs, and how to edit effectively.  Stephen King talks about editing a lot in this book, and just as Silvia's advice about writing can be boiled down to "schedule time, set goals and stick with it", King's advice about writing can be boiled down to "Write freely, then edit closely".  Perhaps it can be boiled down even further:  "Draft".

King often repeats the advice to "write the first draft with the door closed, and the second draft with the door open", meaning the first draft should be written privately, purely for the author's own amusement - but there should always be more than one draft. Subsequent drafts should be cut down and tightened for an audience - and these drafts should be written without being too precious about the original material.  He frequently mentions the quote attributed to Quiller-Couch, "Kill your darlings".

On Writing also points out the need to set aside time for writing and to set goals.  King argues that writing is work, and should be treated as work.  He personally aims to write a certain number of words every day, and writes his works "one word at a time" whether he feels inspired to do so or not.

King wrote much of the book while recovering from a near-fatal accident (he was hit by a car in 1999 and badly injured), and hints of his physical condition are scattered throughout.  The last section of the book returns, to an extent, to memoir territory and deals with the accident and his decision to get back to writing.

The book also contains a section of King's story 1408, shown in it's original, first-draft form and with his editing marks to illustrate the effect editing can have on a piece of writing.

This is a great book for aspiring writers.  King is quite practical and open about the craft of writing, and the book is a genuine piece of advice written by a jobbing writer to help up-and-coming authors hone their skills.

It's also an entertaining book to read, and I thoroughly recommend it to lovers of creative non-fiction.  On Writing is not just a how-to book, but rather a book about writing, and is as interesting and entertaining as Bill Bryson's book about talking a walk in the woods.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Library Opening Hours 2016 January

Happy New Year for 2016.

The libraries on Cairns and Townsville campuses are open at the following times in January 2016.

Townsville Eddie Koiki Mabo Library 

Monday to Friday 8.00 am to 5.00 pm

Saturday and Sunday   CLOSED

Cairns Campus Library 

Monday to  Friday 8.00 am to 5.00 pm 

Saturday and Sunday   CLOSED

Public Holiday 

Australia Day Tuesday January 26    
Both libraries will be CLOSED.

Check out the Opening Hours website for public holiday opening times.

New Book Recommendations

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library, and eBooks are made immediately available to use. You can view and subscribe to the New Library Books list online. For instructions on how to borrow an eBook by downloading it; check out our eBook LibGuide. Some eBooks require logging in with your JCU username and password; additional software will need to be installed to download books to a digital bookshelf. Most eBooks can be read online without downloading extra software.

A title of interest this week is:
The best Australian poems 2015 edited by Geoff Page.
Call number: 820.81A BES

An extract from the publisher's website states:
In The Best Australian Poems 2015, you will find the who’s who of contemporary poets and the pick of new voices. Sometimes satirical, sometimes erotic, covering family, religion, war and mortality, Geoff Page’s selection celebrates the vital, the vigorous and the graceful voices that populate our poetry scene.

Monday, January 4, 2016

Catalogue systems still experiencing some problems

Our cataloguing systems have been taking some time to come back after the reboot, but things should be getting back to normal now.

Please bear with us if there are still some moments of instability with the systems.

We will be taking these technical issues into account when it comes to renewing books, and you can always contact us via phone or email to renew your books for you if the systems are being less than cooperative.

Saturday, January 2, 2016

International Year of Pulses

Yes, you did read that correctly! 2016 is International Year of Pulses. Pulses are annual leguminous crops yielding between one and 12 grains or seeds of variable size, shape and colour within a pod, used for both food and feed. Pulse Australia is running a range of fun events and competitions to promote these tasty crops.

Try this quiz to find out how much you know about pulses. If you are not sure of some of the answers have a look at the following JCU Library books: Dry beans and pulses production, processing, and nutrition and Cereals and pulses: nutraceutical properties and health benefits.