Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Easter 2015 Opening Hours

JCU library wishes everyone a relaxing but productive Easter long weekend for 2015. The library at Cairns and Townsville will have restricted opening hours over the long weekend.

The opening hours over the Easter period at both Cairns and Townsville  are as follows:

Easter Friday        3 April
Closed
Easter Saturday    4 April
1.00pm–5.00pm
Easter Sunday      5 April
Closed
Easter Monday      6 April
1.00pm–5.00pm


The Townsville Mabo Library 24 Hour InfoCommons will be open over the weekend.

New Books recommendations in eBook: Superior Memory

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays inside the library. You can subscribe to the New Library Books email or view the New Books list online.

New eBooks are available online by logging in with your JCU username and password.

A new eBook recommendation is:

 Superior Memory by John Wilding and Elizabeth Valentine

An extract from the book states:

This book examines the nature and causal antecedents of superior memory performance. The main theme is that such performance may depend on either specific memory techniques or natural superiority in the efficiency of one or more memory processes.

The remainder of the book describes the authors' own studies of a dozen memory experts, employing a wide variety of short- and long-term memory tasks. These studies provide a much larger body of data than previously available from studies of single individuals, usually restricted to a narrow range of tasks and rarely involving any systematic study of long-term retention.

The authors argue that in some cases unusual memory ability is not dependent on the use of special techniques. They develop some objective criteria for distinguishing between subjects who demonstrate "natural" superiority and those "strategists" who depend on techniques. Natural superiority was characterised by superior performance on a wider range of tasks and better long-term retention.

Mozzie Pot on Display

The Mabo Library in Townsville  is displaying a collaborative research product created by JCU and University Federal de Minas Gerais staff which will soon be commercially available. It is a device that residents of the torrid tropical zone will appreciate and its called The Mozzie Pot. You can view it near Juliette's Gelato and Coffee shop on the ground floor.  International students and staff to our Tropical university probably now know the blood sucking mosquito is called a mozzie in Australia.

The Mozzie Pot is a revolutionary design in mosquito traps that uses transparent panels to confuse and trap mosquitoes. The concept for the design initially came to Professor Scott Ritchie from James Cook University when he saw mud crabs struggling to escape from a crab pot.

The Mozzie Pot selectively attracts and kills female mosquitoes that carry dengue, such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The Mozzie Pot initially lures mosquitoes in using stagnant water, but once inside the design makes use of the trapped mosquitoes’ innate escape behavior to prevent them from escaping. In trials at James Cook University 90% of mosquitoes entering the Mozzie Pot were not able to escape.

The Mozzie Pot can be used for disease monitoring, by testing the captured mosquitoes for the presence of dengue virus, and also for infection by the dengue-blocking bacteria Wolbachia, which are used in the Eliminate Dengue program. The trap can also be used to capture the Asian Tiger Mosquito, an invasive mosquito that is currently in the Torres Strait and threatens to invade the Australian mainland. The Mozzie Pot is especially useful in developing countries, where electrical power is not available.

James Cook University through the Innovation and Commercialisation team has licensed the Mozzie Pot to the German mosquito-control company Biogents, who are currently manufacturing the trap for worldwide sale.

Happy Birthday, Bach

May 31st is the birthday of Johann Sebastian Bach.

Did you know the library holds CDs and sheet music?  We also have access to the Naxos music database, which has thousands of recordings available online.

When you search for musicians and composers, you can narrow searches in One Search to Music Recordings, and see our online holdings as well as our CDs.

Why not take a look at (or have a listen to) some of our sound recordings for Bach?

Or, if you fancy playing some music yourself, see our musical scores for Bach - we have some of those available online as well.

And, if you just want to do some research on the man and his music, well, we also have books about Bach.

Gosh, we even have a book called About Bach - what more could you want?

Oh, and in case you were wondering, Bach would be 330 years old today.  He was born in 1685 - which, incidentally, was the same year George Frideric Handel died.

Coincidence?

Yeah, probably.

But we have Handel's music, too.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Tolkien Reading Day

"Tolkien 1916". Licensed under
Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
In 2003 the Tolkien Society decided the world really needed a special day set aside to read the works of John Ronald Reuel Tolkien, and they declared March 25th to be Tolkien Reading Day.

Because, you know, no one would ever hear about him otherwise.

Traditionally, this day is celebrated by reading something written by Tolkien.

If you have your own copy of The Hobbit, The Fellowship of the Rings trilogy or any of Tolkien's other, less frequently filmed works, we encourage you to take this opportunity to dig them out and start reading.

If you don't have any Tolkien of your own, why not borrow some of ours?

We've got those hobbity books, if that's what you like, as well as his poems and stories - but don't forget the man used to research and teach Anglo-Saxon.  He was a well known expert on the topic of Old English literature.

So, if you don't feel like getting all hairy-feet-and-elves on Tolkien Reading Day, why not check out his translation of Gawain and the Green Knight?  Or his lectures on Beowulf?  Or that classic discussion of fairy tales, Tree and Leaf?

Actually, I think I'll read Gawain and the Green Knight myself.  You can have the hobbity things.

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Special Collections Fossickings 45: Writing the North

In 1972, when Townsville was pulling itself together after the ravages of Cyclone Althea, a small group of locals gathered to form the Townsville Writers Group. To set this in the context of some of the city’s other arts groups, the writers were somewhat behind the establishment of the Arts Society (1962) and the Townsville Little Theatre (1969) but they preceded both the NQ Opera and Music Theatre Company (1980) and the Townsville Community Music Centre (1983).

Items from the North Queensland Collection, JCU Library Special Collections.
Members described themselves as “embryo short story writers” creating characters, scenes and events in a way that would transport readers to “a completely fictitious world” and as “poets whose joy was in the art of passionate and imaginative language.”  By September they had gathered enough material and confidence to release the first issue of their aptly-titled magazine “In Print”.

Four more issues appeared over the next two years but by 1980 a new group had emerged, bearing the name Writers in Townsville. Over the next decade WIT published eleven issues of a new magazine of short stories and poetry.  In the 1990s this gave way to a series of anthologies released under individual titles, a tradition continued in the new century.

Items from the North Queensland Collection, JCU Library Special Collections.
Non-fiction began to find a larger place in these anthologies in the form of personal anecdotes and memoir, short biographical pieces or descriptions of life in the city as it once was. The most recent, and most ambitious collection, appeared in 2013 as Voices of the North. Here poetry is retained, but fiction is absent. Instead, straight journalistic pieces (some from professional journos like Doug Kingston or John Anderson) mingle with reflective essays prompted by experiences such as an early morning on the river, a backyard barbecue or an old mango tree lost from the city centre.

Items from the North Queensland Collection, JCU Library Special Collections.
Well-known names – Steve Price, the late Bishop Putney, historian Noel Loos and even “the Croc” – give us their thoughts on topics close to their hearts, while other articles reach south to the Burdekin, west to Charters Towers and north to Tully. Clearly the productive and creative members of today’s Writers in Townsville are the direct descendants of those pioneer wordsmiths who, more than four decades ago, found the courage to put their work out there in the public domain.

Footnote: Special Collections holds most of WIT’s publications but some are lacking. If you find any of the following items occupying a dusty shelf at home, please contact us. Items we lack are numbers 3 and 5 of “In Print”, numbers 4 and 10 of “WIT Magazine” as well as the anthologies, “Fifty Flamingos” (1994) and “Sunlight & Shadow” (2004).

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Downloading eBooks LibGuide

It is the 21st Century and JCU Library's collection now has many eBooks. This is a convenient option for students who can't get to the library to borrow because of travel distance or time commitments.

There are two ways to read an eBook:
  1. Read it online in your web browser
  2. Download the item as a short term loan or PDF
 If you choose to download, some items download as PDF files (like most journal articles). However, many eBooks have a restricted borrowing period due to copyright laws and electronic software restrictions. This Digital Rights Management may require you to download additional software.

You can read more about JCU Library's eBooks and how to access and reference them on our eBook Guide.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

New Book Display Recommendation: Introducing intercultural communication: Global cultures in context

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays. You can subscribe to the New Library Books email or view the New Books list online.

A title of interest is:
 Introducing intercultural communication: Global cultures in context by Shuan Liu, Zala Volcic, Cindy Galios. 2nd edition. (2015).
Call number: 302.2 LIU 2015

This title would be of interest to health students doing communication with diverse cultural groups and business students.

An extract from the publishers website states:

Introducing Intercultural Communication uses examples and case studies from around the world to situate communication theory in a truly global perspective. Covering the essentials from international conflict to migration and social networking, this book shows students how to master the skills and concepts at work in how we communicate and understand each other across cultural boundaries.

In this book:
  • Theory boxes show you how to use key ideas in work contexts. 
  • Case studies from European, Chinese, Australian and American contexts give you a truly global perspective.
  • A full chapter gives practical tips on how to become an effective intercultural communicator.
  • Annotated lists of further reading and free access to online SAGE journal articles assist you in your research. 
  • A companion website provides you with exercise questions, as well as extended reading lists

Friday, March 20, 2015

Get help with referencing

We have reached that time of semester when many assignments are due.  Are you having trouble with the referencing component of your assignment...?

The Library InfoHelp Desk at Cairns and Townsville is a place to ask for help.  You can also come along to the Eddie Koiki Mabo Library (Townsville campus) and consult with a dedicated referencing expert on weekdays between 11am to 3pm.


Don't forget that you can also check your references against the examples in the Referencing LibGuide and find out how to format APA, Chicago, Harvard, MLA or Vancouver in-text citations and reference lists.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

New Book Display recommendation: Working with Involuntary Clients

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays. You can subscribe to the New Library Books email or view the New Books list online.

A title of interest is:

Working with Involuntary Clients: A Guide to Practice by Chris Trotter

An extract from the publishers website states: 
How do you help someone who has no interest in being helped?

Social workers face particular challenges when working with involuntary clients who may be resistant or even openly antagonistic to the offer of assistance. This book provides a practical guide to effectively working with individuals and their families in such areas as corrective services, child protection, mental health and residential care.

Upcoming Workshops: Referencing

That time of year is closing in when minor and major essays are due, and the library is running some useful workshops over the next few weeks. See a full list at Library and Computing Services Events.

  • Finding Journal Articles, TSV
    Finding Journal Articles
    Location: 018.002A, Townsville 
    Event starts: Thu, 19 Mar 2015 11:00 - Ends: 12:00
  • APA Referencing, Townsville
    Understand why and how referencing is used, avoid plagiarism and learn to construct an in-text citation and reference list entry correctly.
    Location: 018.002A, Townsville 
    Event starts: Mon, 23 Mar 2015 11:00 - Ends: 12:00
  • Vancouver Referencing, Townsville
    Understand why and how referencing is used, avoid plagiarism and learn to construct an in-text citation and reference list entry correctly.
    Location: 018.002A, Townsville 
    Event starts: Thu, 26 Mar 2015 11:00 - Ends: 12:00


    • APA Referencing, Cairns
      Understand why and how referencing is used, avoid plagiarism and learn to construct an in-text citation and reference list entry correctly.
      Location: B1.104, Cairns 
      Event starts: Wed, 1 Apr 2015 11:00 - Ends: 12:00
    • Finding Journal Articles, Cairns
      Finding Journal Articles
      Location: B1.104, Cairns 
      Event starts: Wed, 1 Apr 2015 13:00 - Ends: 14:00
    • Harvard Referencing, Cairns
      Understand why and how referencing is used, avoid plagiarism and learn to construct an in-text citation and reference list entry correctly.
      Location: B1.104, Cairns 
      Event starts: Thu, 2 Apr 2015 11:00 - Ends: 12:00

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Snakey St Patrick's Day

There is a popular Irish myth involving St Patrick.  According to legend, he chased all the snakes out of Ireland.  Apparently he really hated snakes - which is odd, because he is also said to be the patron saint of snakes.

So far, no saint has come forward to claim the lack of snakes in New Zealand as their responsibility, but Australia has more than enough snakes for both countries (and Ireland, come to think of it), so perhaps we took their quota.

So, in honour of St Patrick's day, we'd like to celebrate the snakes of Australia (it makes sense - just go with it).

Reptiles and amphibians of Australia, by Harold G Cogger.

This CSIRO eBook is chock full of colour photographs, diagrams and descriptions to help you identify and understand various reptiles and amphibians of Australia.

The snakes are towards the end of the book (the first few chapters concentrate on frogs and toads, turtles and tortoises, and lizards).




This book contains full colour photographs of over forty commonly found snakes, and provides a guide to prevention of snake bites (and first-aid treatment, for when the prevention doesn't work).  Offers general information about snakes' feeding habits, breeding and habitation.

Print book, held at 597.960994 EDW.




This is a 1984 reprint of a 1869 book.  It may not list all the known species of snakes in Australia... And it doesn't have any colour photographs at all.

It does have some very nice biological drawings, though.  

Print book, held at 597.960994 KRE.

Close the Gap and Harmony Day 2015

© Commonwealth of Australia 2012
Two days marking equity and diversity are happening this week with Close the Gap on the 19th of March, followed by Harmony Day on the 21st of March. JCU will be holding events on Tuesday 24th of March at the Boathouse in Cairns and in the Education Central Amphitheater in Townsville.

This year marks 15 years for Harmony Day. It is a day to celebrate Australia’s diversity. It is a day of cultural respect for everyone who calls Australia home – from the traditional owners of this land to those who have come from many countries around the world.

Many students in health and human services are doing assignments around delivering services to Australia's diverse peoples and will graduate to work on policy goals like Close the Gap. The library can assist directing people to good resources like the Australia Bureau of Statistics' Cultural Diversity in Australia.

Monday, March 16, 2015

Firefox, IE, Safari, Chrome and other browsers at JCU

We had a woman come to the InfoHelp desk this morning with a browser called "Waterfox" installed on her laptop.  The tech support person who helped her set up her laptop when she bought it told her it was a faster version of Mozilla Firefox.

This seemed like a good opportunity to talk about the different web browsers available and what you need to know when using your own computers to look at JCU systems.

The four big browsers are IE, Safari, Chrome and Firefox.  If you have a Windows computer/device, you will have IE automatically.  If you have an Apple/Mac iThing, then you will have Safari automatically.  If you have an Android device, you'll have Chrome loaded and ready to use.

Whatever you have, if you want to use Firefox you will have to download it - either by using your current web browser to find it, or by looking for it in the appropriate app store.  If you have a Windows or Apple machine, you can also download Chrome if you want.

JCU recommends that you definitely download Firefox, as a lot of our systems are designed to work best when you are using that browser.  For example, if you are having trouble downloading files from LearnJCU, you may find that simply using Firefox instead of IE or Safari can fix that problem.

All of the computers we have on campus have Firefox installed on them, and we recommend that you install it on your own computer/device as well.

As for Waterfox?  Well, it's based on the same technology as Firefox, but it's not actually the same thing.  It's not a Mozilla product and they don't support it (and neither do we).

You can install it and use it if you want (there are many browsers out there to play with), but we still recommend Firefox for using with JCU systems.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Follow the JCU Library Facebook page

JCU Library and Information Services has an official Facebook page.

We post a variety of information ranging from academic support, new resources and of course some lighter moments.

Go to https://www.facebook.com/JCULibrary for another way to stay in touch with the latest library news.

New Book display recommendation: The International Law of Migrant Smuggling

Each week recent purchases are placed on the new book displays. You can subscribe to the New Library Books email or view the New Books list online.

A title of interest: The International Law of Migrant Smuggling
by Anne T.Gallagher and Fiona David 

Law, social science, politics and humanities students might find this of interest with much contemporary media and political discussion devoted to immigration, asylum and people smuggling in Australia.

An extract from the publisher website states

"Whether forced into relocation by fear of persecution, civil war, or humanitarian crisis, or pulled toward the prospect of better economic opportunities, more people are on the move than ever before. Opportunities for lawful entry into preferred destinations are decreasing rapidly, creating demand that is increasingly being met by migrant smugglers. This companion volume to the award-winning The International Law of Human Trafficking, presents the first-ever comprehensive, in-depth analysis into the subject."

Monday, March 9, 2015

International Women's Day

Sunday the 8th of March was International Women’s Day, with events happening from Friday the 6th through to Monday the 9th.

This isn’t intended to be an occasion like Mothers’ Day, where you go around telling women how wonderful they are (but you can if you want to). 

No, it’s an opportunity to reflect on social history and look at the way women’s roles have been defined, challenged and changed over the years – and then consider the current state of gender relations in society.

It just so happens we have some resources that can help with that.

Have a look at some of our books and resources concerning:





And, remember - there are still women in the world who are not legally permitted to drive a car, vote or show their faces in public.  Even in cultures where women supposedly enjoy a greater level of equality and freedom, men are still paid more, on average, than their female counterparts.

It never hurts to remember that there's still a lot of work to do on the gender equality front.

Tip: Using One Search when off campus

One Search is a great way for anyone to find materials to complement study and research even when off campus anywhere in the world. But if you didn't know already, when you search One Search from off campus there are some things you won't see unless you are a current student or staff member.

Some of our subscription collections are not permitted to be viewed by non-JCU people under the terms of our licensing agreements. If you are off campus and are a current student or staff member, you must log in by clicking on the bar at the top of the One Search page that should look like the above image. Your log in is your jc number (for example jc123456) and your password.

Advanced One Search Tips: Wildcards and Proximity Operators


Searches within the Summon service can be performed using two wildcards: the question mark (?)  and the asterisk (*). 

(?) replaces a single character, so organi?ation will search for organisation and organization (and organination oddly enough)

(*) matches zero to any of number characters of within or at the end of a word. So cat* will include cat, cataclysm, catastrophe and catechism. But ca*t will include cat, catalyst and catchment.

Wildcards cannot be used as the first character of a search, nor should a wildcard be used within double quotes (phrase searching).

One Search will include most common plurals automatically, even women/woman, man/men, mice/mouse.

(~) is a 'proximity operator' - use it to return results that have two words close together in any order so "radiation skin"~3 will return results that include these phrases:

  • Radiation-induced skin injuries
  • Managing radiation skin injury
  • Sarcoma and skin radiation oncology
  • Cutaneous radiation syndrome after accidental skin exposure to ionizing radiation
Proximity operators are great when you have keywords that are common, and have many meanings, but when used with each other in a sentence are more likely to refer to a unique meaning. 

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Upcoming training workshops from the Library

The library runs workshops throughout the year so come along to one and build your academic skill set.

EndNote Workshop, Townsville
Learn to track and manage the materials you discover in your research using EndNote - use it in Word to make citing and reference lists simple.
Location: 018.002A, Townsville
Event starts: Tue, 17 Mar 2015 14:00 - Ends: 15:00


EndNote Workshop, Cairns Learn to track and manage the materials you discover in your research using EndNote - use it in Word to make citing and reference lists simple.
Location: B1.105, Cairns
Event starts: Wed, 18 Mar 2015 14:00 - Ends: 15:00


Finding Journal Articles, TSV Finding Journal Articles
Location: 018.002A, Townsville
Event starts: Thu, 19 Mar 2015 11:00 - Ends: 12:00


APA Referencing, Townsville
Understand why and how referencing is used, avoid plagiarism and learn to construct an in-text citation and reference list entry correctly.
Location: 018.002A, Townsville
Event starts: Mon, 23 Mar 2015 11:00 - Ends: 12:00


Find out more on our Events page or contact InfoHelp@jcu.edu.au for any queries.