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52 Book Challenge - Week 39

To the Librarians, James Cook University,

Dear Sirs,
I hope this letter finds you well. I have received, with pleasure, your previous communication, regarding the Fifty-Two Book Reading Challenge. It has been most stimulating and informative, and my colleagues and I have appreciated the opportunity to read a wide variety of books over the past thirty-eight weeks.
However, I wish to inform you that many of the books you have selected for your reviews have been, to put it politely, "unsavoury". We here at the Victorian Gentlemen's Reading Society feel that your readership would be greatly benefited from having their reading tastes restricted to a more genteel selection, and so we applaud the fact that this week's challenge is:
39. A Victorian Novel.
Although, it must be noted that novels should be kept away from impressionable young girls. They are prone to fits of hysteria when over stimulated by tawdry prose.
Regards,
George Allthwarp Victorian Gentlemen's Readin…

A Library of Exquisite Treasures

In correspondence with AIMS about the sale of his scientific library, Sir Maurice Yonge remarked that he was pleased that the books would remain together, and on the North Queensland coast, not far away from Low Isles - the site of his first major research expedition. Sir Maurice highlighted notable volumes contained in the collection, including Beete Jukes’ Voyage of HMS Fly, published in 1847, an author’s copy of Saville-Kent’s now-famous work on the Great Barrier Reef, published in 1893, and an album containing the original prints of Saville-Kent’s photographs taken for that publication. He noted that Saville-Kent’s book was one of the books he took with him to Low Isles in 1928.

The acquisition of Sir Maurice Yonge’s library proved to be something of an administrative challenge for the library staff at AIMS, who then faced the enormous task of sorting and cataloguing the collection. Suzie Davies, now one of JCU Library’s Special Collections volunteers, began working with the Sir …

Reading Challenge Week 38 - An epic poem

The word "epic" is used in many situations and has a variety of meanings, but when it's paired with the word "poem", then we're talking about one thing, really:

A really long poem that tells a story.

Oh, sure, there are other definitions of "epic poetry" - but quite frankly they're all a bit too restrictive for our liking. And, essentially, the all boil down to one thing:

A really long poem that tells a story.

So here are some long story-telling poems we read for this week's challenge.

Brenda Carter read The Rape of the Lockby Alexander Pope
Many years ago I enjoyed reading The Rape of the Lock by Alexander Pope (820 POP 1C RAP/CUN) at university and decided to revisit it for this week’s theme. The Rape of the Lock is an 18th century  mock-epic poem that uses the traditional high stature of classical epics to satirise a trivial social occurrence:
"What dire offense from amorous causes springs,
What mighty contests rise from trivial things…

Banned Books Week - 23-29 September

Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community — librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types — in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restricted in libraries and schools. By focusing on efforts to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship.

While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.

How well do you know banned books? Come and see our Banned Books display or take our quiz.

JCU Library Interlibrary Loans Service

Having trouble locating a book or journal article, or even a DVD that you desperately need for your research project?
Tried OneSearch, our library catalogue and our databases pages and google scholar, but still can't obtain a copy of it?

Why not ask our librarians about the Interlibrary Loans and Document Supply services?

James Cook University Library participates with other libraries around Australia and the wider world to share resources. We can't guarantee that we will find that obscure article about malaria published in Chinese in 1975, but we will have a very good try to locate it for you.

There is a charge for this service, so if you don't have a university fund account to cover the costs of your research, you can make a private payment. Just indicate your preferred option on the form.

Costs are standard for all libraries, and start at $15.00 (we don't charge JCU staff or students  GST) for a core, or non-urgent request. 

We always try to find the article through…

Return... to the Great Barrier Reef

The success of the 1928 Great Barrier Reef Expedition firmly established Maurice Yonge’s international reputation as a zoologist, and in 1932 he was appointed the first Professor of Zoology at the University of Bristol. His professional achievements over the course of his long career earned him many accolades, including election as a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1946, the award of a CBE in 1954, the conferment of a knighthood in 1967, and of honorary degrees from four universities.[1] But his personal life was touched by tragedy when his wife Mattie died in 1945. The true depth of Yonge’s loss can be felt in his dedication to Mattie in his 1949 book The Sea Shore, which read: “In Memory - M.J.Y. - Who will walk on no more shores with me”.

Sir Charles Maurice Yonge Collection
Throughout the course of his life, Sir Maurice Yonge built up an extensive private library of books, reports and papers relating to all aspects of the sea. When aged in his early 80s (and knowing that his health…

Browzine.com API integration with One Search Trial

We are currently trialling Browzine's API in One Search to make access to article PDFs 'one click' where possible.

We are also using the API to make it simple for users to browse the issue the article came from, and from there the entire journal. We hope this will aid 'serendipitous discovery'.
Why are we doing this? We believe there are two advantages to leveraging Browzine's technology within One Search:
One click to PDF - Getting to fulltext from One Search can be problematic - often there are a chain of clicks, first to Find It @ JCU Library, then in the publisher site, and then to the PDF link - and every publisher has a different way of providing a link to the PDFThe link to the issue of a journal opens up a world of possibilites for serendipitous discovery within a discipline, by seeing the article in the context of the issue and journal it appears in we believe students will be exposed to relevant (in the context of their studies, as opposed to the conte…

52 Book Challenge - Week 38

Hello reading champions! Your challenge this week is to read:

38. An epic poem

A poem - that should be quick and easy, right? Maybe not. 

An epic poem tends to be rather long - as long as a novel, in fact, but with an exciting narrative to spur you on. Before the development of writing, epic poems were memorized and played an important part in maintaining a record of the great deeds and history of a culture.

While memorising or even reciting an epic poem this week is optional, we do invite you to read one - think "Beowulf", Homer's "Odyssey" or Milton's "Paradise Lost". 

A quick Google search will give you some examples of epic poems which you can then search for in our library catalogue, if you don't have you own copy. Fortunately we also have some epic poems available as audiobooks.

Have you missed out on hearing about the 52 Book Challenge? Catch up here.


International Day of Peace - 21 September

Each year the International Day of Peace is observed around the world on 21 September. This is a day for people to renew their commitment to peace, both globally and personally. The UN Sustainable Development Goal 16, “Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions” promotes peaceful, inclusive and sustainable societies where there is justice and peace for all.

This year's theme is “The Right to Peace - The Universal Declaration of Human Rights at 70”.

It is time all nations and all people live up to the words of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognizes the inherent dignity and equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human race. This year marks the 70th anniversary of that landmark document.

                                                                                          - UN Secretary-General António Guterres

The Cairns JCU library will be celebrating the International Day of Peace all week. Come in and view our display, relax while colo…

Reading Challenge Week 37 - A Book about Philosophy

To read or not to read? Liz, Scott and Brenda chose the affirmative. How did you go? I was surprised by the number of philosophy books on our shelves, as well as the many ebooks available. Did you learn about Aristotle, Confucius or Descartes? Or perhaps you read a book with a hearty dose of homespun philosophy? We'd love to hear your recommendations.

Elizabeth Smyth read The Philosophy of Tragedy: From Plato to Žižek, by Julian Young.

If you have ever wondered why people are drawn to tragic events, either as spectators or participants, this is the book for you.
Young takes us on a journey through the minds of renowned philosophers, from Plato and Aristotle through to Schopenhauer and Nietzsche and beyond. He considers the ideas of writers too, such as Miller and Camus.
Simple explanations help the lay reader understand what has clearly taken decades of scholarship to derive. For example, to help us understand Plato, Young likens poets to the media. We can then more easily understand …

Vetstream Bovis Now Available

JCU Library now has access to Vetstream Bovis as part of the Vetlexicon service. This is an expanding section of the Vetlexicon package for students and educators in the veterinary field dealing with cattle.

There are over 21,000 resources for diagnosis and treatment including multimedia. Information is updated weekly, and links to a range of learning products and external sources are provided.

Vetstream Bovis joins JCU's existing suite of Vetstream products, including Vetstream Canis, Felis, and Equis.

While the database is designed for veterinarians and vet students, pet owners and animal lovers don't miss out, with over 700 factsheets across the databases. Ever wondered why your horse walks around in circles in a small area? Or how to test for food allergy in dogs? Perhaps your kitten needs to learn socialization skills? Hop on over to Vetstream to learn more about your furry family members.

Expedition to the Great Barrier Reef 1928-1929 - Part 5

Significance of the Great Barrier Reef Expedition
In their 2002 publication The Great Barrier Reef: history, science, heritage, James Bowen and Margarita Bowen described the 1928 expedition to the Great Barrier Reef as: “the greatest marine science venture on a global scale since the Challenger oceanographic expedition more than fifty years earlier.”[1]  C.M. Yonge’s pioneering work, particularly on coral physiology, is considered to this day to be an outstanding contribution to coral science, and the coral reef research conducted under his leadership is still considered as basic reference material. T.A. Stephenson’s work with Tandy, Spender, Fraser, Manton and wife Anne Stephenson, on the structure and ecology of the reefs at Low Isles, resulted in a detailed ecological survey on a previously unseen scale. In collaboration with his wife Anne, Stephenson also made a major contribution to the then current state of knowledge of growth and asexual reproduction of corals.[2]

The full exte…

52 Book Challenge - Week 37

It’s time to think about thinking for the sake of thought. That’s right, it’s time to get philosophical. This week we have the challenge of reading:

37. A book about philosophy 

Ok, so a book about philosophy might not inspire everyone (although we do have many key texts if this takes your philosophical fancy) so we’ll expand the challenge a little to include books that are philosophical and/or explore philosophical ideas. That should give us a lot to work with this week.

Have you missed out on hearing about the 52 Book Challenge? Catch up here.

Not waving but drowning: Cathy McLennan's Saltwater

On his first visit to Palm Island in 1968 the young historian Henry Reynolds had been shocked to find two young girls locked up in a police cell for swearing at a teacher. Some things change slowly in the north. Around a quarter of a century later, 22-year-old barrister, Cathy McLennan was similarly shocked by the discovery of a small girl curled up alone in a Palm Island cell. “Olivia” (most names have been changed in this book) became Cathy’s shadow that day and haunts the pages of Saltwater as she does Cathy’s life. You will not forget her.

This discovery was not the only confronting situation Cathy faced. Back in Townsville the next day she found she was to defend a murder charge against four boys, the youngest only thirteen. Although this book looks disconcertingly like a novel, its narrative stems directly from these and other experiences that Cathy confronted in her new job with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service. Small wonder they stayed vividly in mind.

Sa…

RU OK? Day - 13 September

Thursday 13 September is RU OK? Day. R U OK? Day is a national day of action dedicated to reminding everyone that any day is the day to ask, “Are you ok?” and support those struggling with life. Taking part can be as simple as learning R U OK?’s four steps so you can have a conversation that could change a life.

Student Life, together with Student Equity & Wellbeing (SEW), Human Resources (HR) and JCU Student Association (JCUSA) have collaborated to coordinate an event for both staff and students. Please come along and join us for a cuppa, cake and conversation.

Townsville & Cairns Campus
Where: Library Lawns
When: 13 September 10:30am – 12:30pm
What’s on: Iced tea and coffee, cake and cupcakes, JCUSA BBQ, SEW activities, HR information, social sport, giant games, giveaways & more!!

To find out more about the R U OK campaign, please click here https://www.ruok.org.au/

Reading Challenge Week 36 - A Book you own but haven't read

I think we can all identify with this week’s challenge in one way or another – A book you own but haven’t read. Whether you have a book-buying obsession, just like having books around (they are friends, after all) or are plain too busy with work, study or family life, those unread books seem to pile up at an alarming rate!

We look forward to reading about the unread books you read this week (an oxymoron, I know). Here are some of ours:

Samantha Baxter read The songs of distant Earthby Arthur C. Clarke (820 CLAR(A) 1C SON)

I have been meaning to read more science fiction so I took this opportunity to read one of the classics I had sitting on my bookshelf. I have only read one other Arthur C. Clarke novel -2001: A Space Odyssey and, I think having read this, I will endeavour to find more.

Songs of Distant Earth tells the story of humanity spreading out across space from the perspective of a colony on an ocean world. Hundreds of years earlier, seed ships had been sent out to habitable pla…

International Literacy Day - 8 September

On 8 September 2018, International Literacy Day will be celebrated around the world with the theme ‘Literacy and skills development’. Despite progress made, at least 750 million people worldwide still lack basic literacy skills. Two-thirds of the these people are women and 102 million of them are youth aged 15 to 24. This year, International Literacy Day explores and highlights integrated approaches to literacy and skills development that will ultimately improve people’s life and work, and contribute to equitable and sustainable societies.

Developing information literacy skills is core business for the JCU Library. Librarians can help develop your skills in classes and workshops, at the InfoHelp desk and via online Chat. Our libguides and videos on finding, evaluating and referencing information are available 24/7.  The Learning Centre also offers a wealth of support for language, literacy and academic writing.

World History in Video

Game of Thrones and  Vikings cannot compete with the real story - how much more dramatic is truth? World History in Video currently has twelve documentaries on the Vikings, and over a thousand on history in general. You can select from several themes, from War and violence to Family history, the Middle Ages and many many more. There are featured playlists on popular themes. It is also possible to search by name, place, narrator, or language. Each video includes a transcript and links to related documents or other material.

The documentaries cover all historical periods up to the present, although the emphasis is on Western and American history, people, and events.

Knights and armor looks into the technology of armor and the practice of war in the middle ages.

A more recent vision of war is explored through the film Oscar Schindler: The accidental hero, from the BBC in 1997.


Sacred women of the Iron Age investigates archaeological history in Britain. In particular, it builds a picture o…